news for News https://www.csuohio.edu/news/news Cleveland State University News en CSU President Harlan Sands appointed to NCAA Division I Board of Directors https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-president-harlan-sands-appointed-ncaa-division-i-board-directors <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><span><span><b>CLEVELAND, Ohio – August 7, 2020 – </b>Cleveland State University President Harlan M. Sands has been appointed to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Board of Directors representing the Horizon League. His four-year term begins this month.</span></span></p><p><span><span>He joins a board that consists of 20 university presidents, CEOs and chancellors as well as one director of athletics, one senior female administrator, one faculty athletics representative and one student-athlete. Collectively, the board provides strategic direction and oversight for the Division I collegiate model.  The Division I Board of Directors reports to the NCAA Board of Governors and oversees committees that include the Division I Council, Committee on Infractions, Infractions Appeals, Presidential Forum and Committee on Academics.</span></span></p><p><span><span>“It is an honor to have been chosen to serve on the Division I board, and a privilege to represent the Horizon League,” said President Sands. “At CSU, we are strong believers in the value Division I athletics provides in enhancing the experience of our student-athletes and instilling pride across campus and among our alumni. I look forward to working with fellow board members and staff leadership to advance the NCAA’s mission.”</span></span></p><p><span><span>“We’re very pleased to have President Sands representing the Horizon League on the NCAA Board of Directors,” said Jonathan B. LeCrone, Horizon League Commissioner. “Since arriving at Cleveland State University, he has been an excellent addition to our league’s Board of Directors, working on behalf of CSU and the Horizon League’s student-athletes. He brings a wealth of experience in higher education and we know he will represent CSU and the Horizon League well.” </span></span></p><p><span><span>Scott Garrett, CSU Director of Athletics, added “Our coaches, staff and student-athletes are fortunate to have President Sands’ enthusiastic support for our mission of delivering a transformational student-athlete experience at CSU. The Horizon League could not have nominated a better leader to help play a part in the future of the NCAA during this critical time and we look forward to assisting him in this capacity.”</span></span>​​​​​​​</p><p><span><span><b>About Cleveland State University </b></span></span></p><p><span><span>Founded in 1964, Cleveland State University is a public research institution that provides a dynamic setting for Engaged Learning. With 17,000-plus students, ten colleges and schools and more than 175 academic programs, CSU was again chosen for 2020 as one of America’s best universities by U.S. News &amp; World Report. Find more information at <a href="http://www.csuohio.edu">www.csuohio.edu</a>. </span></span></p></div></div></div> Fri, 07 Aug 2020 17:10:22 +0000 6001031 22954 at https://www.csuohio.edu Promoting Safe Measures at Cleveland State University https://www.csuohio.edu/news/promoting-safe-measures-cleveland-state-university <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6><img alt="Cleveland State University President Sands and Provost Zhu with students outside wearing masks" height="390" width="1000" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/mask-shoot_slider2.png" title="" />​​​​​​​<span><span><span>Cleveland State University has committed to creating a safe environment for students, faculty and staff during the COVID-19 pandemic, promoting practices to maintain the health and wellness of those on campus with a new campaign called “Safe Campus CSU.” </span></span></span>​​​​​​​</h6><p><span><span><span>Last week, CSU President Harlan Sands met up with students and university mascot, Magnus,  for a “Safe Campus CSU” photoshoot.  The “Viking” team posed to demonstrate proper social distancing and how to mask-up on campus. </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>“I'm proud to lead by example, not just for my own health, but for my friends, classmates, and others who are, or are living with, people at higher risk for a severe case,” shared Connor Mahon. “We all want to be on the other side of this pandemic as soon as possible, and wearing a mask is such an easy action that will help us get there.”</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>The photos captured will be used to set standards and spread important messages of health and safety throughout the CSU community. Additionally, the photos will be published with CSU’s “Mask-Up Campaign,” which promotes masks and their importance through social media posts and encouragement from all departments of the CSU community.</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>President Sands tasked the students who participated in the photoshoot with being student ambassadors for the “Safe Campus CSU” campaign, challenging them to uphold safety standards among their peers. “Safe Campus CSU” includes a revamp across campus: hand washing and sanitizing stations, banners and signage reinforcing social distancing and mask usage, protective barriers and limited capacity warnings.  </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>Cleveland State will continue to create measures that are in the best interest of students, faculty and staff during the pandemic, as well as uphold a commitment to the greatest standards on campus while working together as a Viking community.</span></span></span></p><p class="BasicParagraph"><span><span><span><span><b><span>About Cleveland State University </span></b></span></span></span></span></p><p class="BasicParagraph"><span><span><span><span><span>Founded in 1964, Cleveland State University is a public research institution that provides a dynamic setting for Engaged Learning. With 17,000-plus students, ten colleges and schools and more than 175 academic programs, CSU was again chosen for 2020 as one of America’s best universities by U.S. News &amp; World Report. Find more information at </span><a href="http://www.csuohio.edu"><span>www.csuohio.edu</span></a><span>. </span></span></span></span></span></p><p class="BasicParagraph" align="center"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>### </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div></div></div> Thu, 30 Jul 2020 19:16:20 +0000 6001031 22942 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Board of Trustees Reviews Plans for Fall Semester, President’s Performance https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-board-trustees-reviews-plans-for-fall-semester-president%E2%80%99s-performance <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><span><span><span>CLEVELAND (July 28, 2020) –</span> <span>Cleveland State University’s Board of Trustees met today to review and discuss CSU’s fall semester repopulation plan, receive an update on “CSU 2.0”, the University plan to reimagine its future, evaluate President Sands’ performance, and set goals and objectives for the coming year.  In unanimously passing a resolution in support of President Sands’ performance and approving his goals for FY21, the trustees voiced strong approval and confidence in the President and his leadership team and praised the way CSU has approached the current pandemic crisis. </span></span></span>​​​​​​​</p><p><span><span><span><span>The Trustees expressed confidence in the University’s plan to repopulate campus beginning Aug. 24, commending the administration for its data-driven approach to providing a safe teaching and learning environment. It also expressed public support for the way President Sands and the leadership team have<span> advanced a spirit of collaboration and partnership at CSU, working closely with faculty, staff and students to transition teaching and learning to remote delivery, establish thorough campus repopulation protocols, and promote shared approaches to campus health and safety and financial challenges. </span></span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>In providing the president’s annual evaluation, the Board cited his firm leadership both before and during the pandemic crisis and his demonstrated ability to build partnerships, recruit talent, forge relationships, and advance CSU’s standing locally, nationally, and globally. </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>“Harlan Sands has done a tremendous job in his first two years. He was the right leader for CSU before the pandemic, and now there is no one our trustees would rather have leading us during an especially challenging time,” said David Gunning, chair of the CSU Board of Trustees. “His experience, keen insight and ability to collaborate across our university and community has kept CSU on an upward trajectory.”</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>Overall enrollments and progression rates at CSU are stronger than ever, with the largest fall freshmen class in history last year, an increase in graduate enrollments this year, and increases in retention and graduation rates across the board for all student groups. </span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>Under Sands leadership, CSU strengthened its financial statement and balance sheet, implemented new recruitment and marketing strategies, established three new enrollment partnership pipelines with Cuyahoga Community College, Lorain County Community College, and Lakeland Community College, established a ground-breaking Living Learning Community for CMSD students (through a partnership with Parker Hannifin), and secured additional multi-million dollar gifts from several major contributors including <span>The NRP Group and The Millennia Companies, Lee and Ageleke Zapis, and The Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation. During this past year, overall fundraising increased 2.5% to </span><span>$8.3M, and </span><span>annual Giving Day </span><span>contributions to CSU increased over 50% with more than $460,000 raised from 2,500 plus donors, setting new records in both giving and donor totals. </span></span></span></span></span></p><p class="BasicParagraph"><span><span><span><span><b><span>About Cleveland State University </span></b></span></span></span></span></p><p class="BasicParagraph"><span><span><span><span><span>Founded in 1964, Cleveland State University is a public research institution that provides a dynamic setting for Engaged Learning. With 17,000-plus students, ten colleges and schools and more than 175 academic programs, CSU was again chosen for 2020 as one of America’s best universities by U.S. News &amp; World Report. Find more information at </span><a href="http://www.csuohio.edu"><span>www.csuohio.edu</span></a><span>. </span></span></span></span></span></p><p class="BasicParagraph" align="center"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>### </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div></div></div> Tue, 28 Jul 2020 17:16:59 +0000 6001031 22934 at https://www.csuohio.edu Special Board Meeting of the CSU Board of Trustees – July 28, 2020 https://www.csuohio.edu/news/trustees-meeting <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><strong>Special Board Meeting of the CSU Board of Trustees – July 28, 2020</strong></p><p>The Cleveland State University Board of Trustees will hold a special meeting on Tuesday, July 28, 2020, at 8:00 a.m. to receive updates relative to COVID-19 pandemic matters and consider other business per the agenda below. </p><p>The meeting will be held via Zoom. To join the meeting, please click the following link: <a href="https://csuohio.zoom.us/j/97767628760">https://csuohio.zoom.us/j/97767628760</a>. To join the meeting via audio only, please dial 929-436-2866, meeting ID 97767628760.</p><p><img alt="CSU logo" height="69" width="400" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="4" typeof="foaf:Image" src="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/NewCSU-stacked4.png" title="" />​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​</p><h6>BOARD OF TRUSTEES - SPECIAL MEETING</h6><p><strong>July 28, 2020<br />8:00 a.m. via Zoom<br />AGENDA OF BUSINESS</strong></p><p><strong>I. CALL TO ORDER/NOTICE OF QUORUM</strong><br />​​​​​​​David H. Gunning II, Chair<br />A. Minutes of the May 21, 2020 Board Meeting</p><p><strong>II. REPORT OF THE CHAIR </strong><br />Mr. Gunning<br />B. Recognition of Faculty Trustee Bill Bowen<br />Board Resolution <br /><br /><strong>III. REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT </strong><br />Harlan M. Sands, President </p><p><strong>IV. REPORT OF THE CSU FOUNDATION </strong><br />Thomas E. Hopkins, Chair, <br />CSU Foundation </p><p>C. FY20 Fundraising Reports through June 30, 2020 Julie M. Rehm, Vice President<br />    University Advancement</p><p><strong>V. CONSENT AGENDA   Mr. Gunning</strong><br />D. Approval of New Degree Program </p><ul><li>BS in Healthcare Management  </li></ul><p>E. Approval of Faculty Personnel Policy Revisions </p><ul><li>3344-11-02 Definitions</li><li>3344-11-07 Chair Dean Evaluations</li><li>3344-13-03 Graduation, convocation and assembly committee</li><li>3344-16-07 Retirement </li><li>​​​​​​​3344-21-02 Policy on academic misconduct</li></ul><p>F. Approval of Wyse Advertising Contract </p><p>G. Dean Tenure Approval </p><ul><li>Dr. Kenneth Kahn, Dean, Monte Ahuja College of Business</li></ul><p>H. Faculty Tenure Approval</p><ul><li>Dr. Tawanda M. Greer-Medley, College of Education and Human Services</li></ul><p>I. Approval of Bi-Polar Ionization – Air Cleaning Technology                                                                                                                                 </p><p><strong>VI. EXECUTIVE SESSION</strong>  <br />Mr. Gunning</p><p><strong>VII. UNFINISHED BUSINESS</strong><br />Mr. Gunning</p><p><strong>VIII. NEW BUSINESS</strong><br />Mr. Gunning<br />J. Approval of FY21 Presidential Goals </p><p><strong>IX. ADJOURNMENT </strong><br />​​​​​​​Mr. Gunning</p><p><strong>Next meeting to be held Thursday, September 17, 2020</strong></p><p># # #</p><p> </p><p> </p></div></div></div> Fri, 24 Jul 2020 19:51:54 +0000 6002238 22930 at https://www.csuohio.edu Cleveland State Commissions Five Task Forces to Develop Recommendations for “CSU 2.0”  https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-20 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><strong>CLEVELAND – July 20, 2020</strong> – CSU President Harlan M. Sands today announced the creation of five distinct Task Forces – one each for Academics, Administration, Diversity/Inclusion, Athletics, and Growth/Innovation – to reimagine the university’s future and put it on a path to become “CSU 2.0.” Members of the Task Forces include an interdisciplinary cross-section of faculty, staff and students, as well as distinguished advisors from the community and academia. </p><p>President Sands’ full message to the campus community follows:</p><p><strong>CSU 2.0 – Reimagining Our Future<br />​​​​​​​</strong><br />To our campus community:</p><p>Now that we have taken major strides together on a plan to repopulate our campus this fall, and made some difficult initial decisions to stabilize our campus financials, it is time to move ahead with our process to come up with a thoughtful, actionable plan that will help us emerge from this pandemic a stronger and more focused institution – an institution that is true to our beliefs and core values, and fully ready to meet the future needs of our students, our city, and the region. </p><p>If there is one thing we’ve learned these past few months, it is that our CSU community will pull together in a time of great need to deliver on our “Engaged Learning” promise. Faced with a world-wide public health crisis, we demonstrated our ability to stay connected, successfully moving our coursework online, our workforce to home offices, and our many support services to virtual networks. Now, armed with what we have learned about our new environment, ourselves, and the changing needs of our society around us, we are ready to apply this knowledge to our future – a reimagined future – as part of our “CSU 2.0” initiative.</p><p>Over the past weeks, following up on the work of our initial CSU 2.0 Task Force, we have been in dialogue with a wide cross-section of University trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, and students, all of whom are ready, willing, and excited to participate in the next phase of our process.<br /> <br />Today we are commissioning 5 distinct Task Forces – one each for Academics, Administration, Diversity/Inclusion, Athletics, and Growth/Innovation – to prioritize and hone in on more specific recommendations that will further refine our future strategic priorities, teaching and learning pedagogies, alignment of resources, and investments. Over the next four months, these teams will work collectively and independently to reimagine the CSU of today and make recommendations that will put us on a path to the CSU we will be tomorrow. <br /> <br />For Academics, Provost Zhu has already been working with faculty senate leadership to set up a process to review the alignment of our colleges, school and departments to identify efficiencies, assess faculty workloads and incentives, examine course scheduling and class size protocols, and maximize multidisciplinary connectivity. This work will roll up to the Academic Task Force, to be chaired jointly by Provost Zhu and new Faculty Senate President Bob Krebs. Both will be assisted by former Northeastern University President Richard Freeland, who led Northeastern through a 10-year period of growth, innovation, and faculty partnership. Campus membership includes: <a href="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/Academics_.pdf">list here</a>.</p><p>To review campus-wide administrative support functions, I have asked Michael Biehl, our Senior VP for Finance and Administration, and Jeanell Hughes, our Chief Talent Officer and Chief Human Resources Officer to lead our effort. The Administration Task Force will conduct an assessment of organizational structure and campus support services and recommend a set of reforms and changes to improve performance/service, and reduce costs. Campus membership includes: <a href="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/Administration_.pdf">list here</a>.<br /> <br />Dr. Ronnie Dunn, CSU’s Interim Chief Diversity Officer and Peggy Zone Fisher, CEO of The Diversity Center of Northeast Ohio will co-lead the Diversity &amp; Inclusion Task Force, which will work closely with the already-established President’s Diversity Council. This group is charged with recommending those actions that will most impact how we conduct ourselves across campus, how we advance, support and promote our diverse faculty and staff and effectively increase their ranks, and how we support and educate our students. </p><p>The Growth and Innovation Task Force will be led by Senior Vice President for Research, Innovation, and Health Care Strategy Dr. Forrest Faison. This group will examine how to best identify opportunities where CSU can invest and grow. Initially, they will focus on strategic growth initiatives in research, engineering, and the sciences, health education to support Cleveland and the region as a health destination and technology hub, adult learning and online opportunities, and workforce needs. Campus membership includes: <a href="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/Growth%20%26%20Innovation%20Task%20Force.pdf">list here</a>.</p><p>Finally, a review of Athletics will be directed by Athletic Director Scott Garrett with the assistance of former University of Missouri Athletic Director Mike Alden, a recent contributor and trusted advisor to CSU Athletics who has a strong track record of success. Campus membership includes: <a href="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/Athletics2.pdf">list here</a>.<br /> <br />To ensure that our 5 Task Forces are working in unison and cross-pollinating ideas, I will engage regularly and directly with Task Force leadership. I also expect our Task Forces to freely reach out for subject matter expertise and other advice within our CSU and larger constituent communities, as needed. As I have stressed from the outset, this is meant to be an inclusive and iterative exercise, and we will continue to engage as deeply and widely as we can to ensure no voice goes unheard. </p><p>As our work moves forward, we will keep you informed through our bi-weekly live Town Halls, a soon-to-be-activated CSU 2.0 web page, and communications through our established faculty, staff, and student groups. </p><p>I have asked for each Task Force to make final recommendations by November 16.</p><p>Moving forward, I am confident we will come out of this stronger and even more ready to serve our students, partner with our community, and build our future together. </p><p>Harlan M. Sands <br />President<br />Cleveland State University</p><p><br /><strong>About Cleveland State University </strong><br />Founded in 1964, Cleveland State University is a public research institution that provides a dynamic setting for Engaged Learning. With 17,000-plus students, ten colleges and schools and more than 175 academic programs, CSU was again chosen iin 2020 as one of America’s best universities by U.S. News &amp; World Report. Find more information at <a href="http://www.csuohio.edu. ">www.csuohio.edu. </a></p><p> </p></div></div></div> Thu, 23 Jul 2020 16:45:12 +0000 6002238 22919 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Statement in Support of Governor Mike DeWine’s ReStart Ohio Higher Education Plan https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-statement-in-support-governor-mike-dewine%E2%80%99s-restart-ohio-higher-education-plan <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><span><span><b><span><span><span>CLEVELAND – July 9, 2020</span></span></span></b><span><span><span> – Following Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s unveiling of his Restart Ohio plan for higher education earlier today, Cleveland State University issued the following statement of support:</span></span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span><span>Cleveland State University joins with other Ohio colleges and universities across the state in applauding the unwavering leadership Governor Mike DeWine has shown throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Today, he further demonstrated that leadership in announcing a thorough and well-reasoned set of guidelines to assist Ohio’s institutions of higher education in repopulating their campuses in the safest way possible this fall.</span></span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The Governor and his staff and advisors have consistently sought input from higher education in developing these guidelines and have listened to our hopes and concerns for the return to in-person teaching and learning on our campuses. He recognizes the significant challenges involved in returning to on-campus operations in a way that is as safe as possible for students, faculty and staff, and has been steadfast in advocating for additional federal funding to help make that possible.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span><b><span><span>About Cleveland State University </span></span></b></span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Founded in 1964, Cleveland State University is a public research institution that provides a dynamic setting for Engaged Learning. With 17,000-plus students, ten colleges and schools and more than 175 academic programs, CSU was again chosen for 2020 as one of America’s best universities by U.S. News &amp; World Report. Find more information at <a href="http://www.csuohio.edu">www.csuohio.edu</a>. </span></span></span></span></span></span>​​​​​​​</p><p align="center"><span><span><span><span><span><span># # #</span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div></div></div> Thu, 09 Jul 2020 19:44:23 +0000 6001031 22905 at https://www.csuohio.edu Cleveland State prepares for in-person + online learning this fall https://www.csuohio.edu/news/cleveland-state-prepares-for-in-person-online-learning-fall <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><img alt="Harlan M. Sands" height="390" width="1000" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/Slider_2.jpg" title="" />​​​​​​​</p><p>Cleveland State University President Harlan Sands was interviewed by WKYC Channel 3 reporter Mark Naymik about CSU’S plans for 2020 Fall Semester. The two walked CSU’s 85-acre campus during the interview as President Sands outlined aspects of the university’s plans, including reconfiguring classroom spaces to allow for social distancing, requiring face masks while on campus, as well as additional safety measures that will allow CSU to offer more than half of Fall 2020 classes on campus.</p><p>You can view the segment <a href="https://www.wkyc.com/video/news/education/cleveland-state-prepares-for-in-person-online-learning-this-fall/95-15c48913-c10e-483e-b846-36ef6f0cb9b4">here</a> on WKYC’s website.  More information on CSU’s plans for Fall Semester can be found <a href="https://www.csuohio.edu/safe-campus/safe-campus">here</a>.</p><p>​​​​​​​</p></div></div></div> Thu, 02 Jul 2020 15:56:39 +0000 6002238 22897 at https://www.csuohio.edu Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland State University Receive $1.2 Million NIH Award to Recruit Underrepresented Minority Ph.D. Students https://www.csuohio.edu/news/cleveland-clinic-cleveland-state-university-receive-12-million-nih-award-recruit <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6><img alt="Ph.D. student in science research lab" height="390" width="1000" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/front_page_slideshow/NIH-grant-new.png" title="" />​​​​​​​Research team aims to increase number of minority scientists in Cleveland area</h6><p><strong>July 2, 2020, CLEVELAND:</strong> At a time when the national conversation is focused on narrowing the gap of racial equity, two of Cleveland’s anchor institutions have been awarded grant funding that will help them turn words into action.</p><p><a href="https://www.csuohio.edu/">Cleveland State University</a> and <a href="https://my.clevelandclinic.org/">Cleveland Clinic</a> Lerner Research Institute received a five-year, $1.2 million T32 training award from the National Institutes of Health to recruit underrepresented minority Ph.D. students and students underrepresented in the science and technology workforce. </p><p>The two institutions will recruit the students into their biomedical research programs, building a pipeline of minority scientists in the Cleveland area. </p><p>The grant is a collaborative initiative involving the joint graduate school programs of the two institutions. Meredith Bond, Ph.D., of Cleveland State, and Christine Moravec, Ph.D., of Lerner Research Institute, are co-principal investigators on the grant, titled “CD-Cavs: Cross-Disciplinary Cardiovascular Sciences Training to Diversify the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) Workforce.”</p><p>“This is a new and exciting chapter for our institutions which have partnered for 50 years to train Ph.D. students for careers in biomedical sciences,” said Cleveland State University President Harlan Sands. “These students will benefit from the unique pairing of an urban university recognized for cutting-edge research and a world-renowned academic medical center to deliver an experience consistent with our mission of advancing both them and the larger research community.”</p><p>The grant comes amidst the backdrop of a broad national call for diversity and inclusion and underscores the role universities and hospitals have in doing more than just moving the conversation forward. </p><p>“At Cleveland Clinic inclusion is one of our core values. A program like this serves as an example of how we can infuse much- needed diversity into our research community,” said Cleveland Clinic CEO and President Tom Mihaljevic, M.D. “By bringing together individuals with different experiences and perspectives, we can capitalize on the diversity of thought that can lead to innovative approaches to address complex scientific questions. Along with our academic partner, we can work towards building a more robust scientific workforce reflective of the community at large and address long-standing structural racism that leads to healthcare disparities.”</p><p>According to the National Science Foundation, African Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans make up about 31% of the U.S. population but only represent 13% of those receiving doctorate degrees in science and engineering. </p><p>“Historically, there has been a lack of diversity in the scientific workforce, yet studies have shown that diversity increases creativity, promotes higher quality problem-solving and enhances innovation,” said Moravec, cardiovascular research scientist and director of Research Education and Training at Lerner Research Institute. “This grant will enable our institutions to work together to broaden the diversity, backgrounds, experiences and perspectives of those entering STEM fields and the biomedical research workforce.”</p><p>“This program is unique because students will benefit from the diverse student culture at Cleveland State while training in labs at CSU and at the top U.S hospital in the nation for cardiovascular care. The successful outcome of this grant will be 15 to 20 Ph.D. candidates from under-represented backgrounds, sharing the resources of both CSU and Cleveland Clinic, and joining the ranks of STEM professionals,” said Bond, Dean of the College of Sciences and Health Professions at Cleveland State. “Recruiting more diversity into STEM careers is essential to achieve not only equity, but also optimal outcomes and successes in biomedical/bioengineering research.”</p><p>The grant will support the recruitment, education and laboratory training of five Ph.D. students per year over the next 5 years. The trainees will be part of longstanding joint Ph.D. programs between Lerner Research Institute and Cleveland State. The students will complete advanced coursework for their Ph.D. at Cleveland State and will complete their dissertation research in a cardiovascular research lab at one of the two locations. Their individual advisory committees will include faculty from both organizations. Each student will have a clinician mentor in addition to a laboratory-based mentor, facilitating their education in the clinical manifestations of diseases they will study in the laboratory and their integration of laboratory findings into clinical care.</p><p>In addition to a wealth of seminars and career development opportunities available to all trainees in the joint Ph.D. programs, additional enrichment activities will be designed for this group of students. They will receive mentoring and professional development based on their individual backgrounds and needs and will participate in regular discussion groups with other trainees from under-represented backgrounds, discussing challenges and opportunities. <br /> </p><p><strong>About Cleveland Clinic</strong><br /><a href="https://my.clevelandclinic.org/">Cleveland Clinic</a> is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Located in Cleveland, Ohio, it was founded in 1921 by four renowned physicians with a vision of providing outstanding patient care based upon the principles of cooperation, compassion and innovation. Cleveland Clinic has pioneered many <a href="https://my.clevelandclinic.org/about/overview/who-we-are/facts-figures#innovations-tab">medical breakthroughs</a>, including coronary artery bypass surgery and the first face transplant in the United States. U.S. News &amp; World Report consistently names Cleveland Clinic as one of the nation’s best hospitals in its annual “America’s Best Hospitals” survey. Among Cleveland Clinic’s 67,554 employees worldwide are more than 4,520 salaried physicians and researchers, and 17,000 registered nurses and advanced practice providers, representing 140 medical specialties and subspecialties. Cleveland Clinic is a 6,026-bed health system that includes a 165-acre main campus near downtown Cleveland, 18 hospitals, more than 220 outpatient facilities, and locations in southeast Florida; Las Vegas, Nevada; Toronto, Canada; Abu Dhabi, UAE; and London, England. In 2019, there were 9.8 million total outpatient visits, 309,000 hospital admissions and observations, and 255,000 surgical cases throughout Cleveland Clinic’s health system. Patients came for treatment from every state and 185 countries. Visit us at <a href="https://my.clevelandclinic.org/">clevelandclinic.org</a>. Follow us at <a href="https://twitter.com/CCforMedia">twitter.com/CCforMedia</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/ClevelandClinic">twitter.com/ClevelandClinic</a>. News and resources available at <a href="https://newsroom.clevelandclinic.org/">newsroom.clevelandclinic.org</a>.</p><p><br /><strong>About Cleveland State University</strong><br />Founded in 1964, Cleveland State University is a public research institution that provides a dynamic setting for Engaged Learning. With 17,000-plus students, ten colleges and schools and more than 175 academic programs, CSU was again chosen for 2019 as one of America’s best universities by U.S. News &amp; World Report. Find more information at <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/of6nC5yxOoFZWGkLpTOf3C9?domain=csuohio.edu/">www.csuohio.edu</a>.</p><p><br /> </p></div></div></div> Thu, 02 Jul 2020 15:34:36 +0000 6002238 22896 at https://www.csuohio.edu Ronnie Dunn testifies before Ohio Senate Committee on racism as a public health crisis https://www.csuohio.edu/news/ronnie-dunn-testifies-before-ohio-senate-committee-racism-public-health-crisis <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Dr. Ronnie Dunn, interim chief diversity officer and associate professor of urban studies at Cleveland State University, provided testimony on June 24 before the Ohio Senate Health, Human Services &amp; Medicaid Committee in support of SCR14, which would declare racism a public health crisis in Ohio. Similar legislation was already passed by the City of Cleveland.<br /><br />Dunn, who serves on the Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board and the Ohio Minority Health Strike Force, drew attention in his testimony to disparities in average life expectancy between blacks and whites in Cuyahoga County. He further noted higher rates of low birth weight in African Americans babies, higher infant mortality rates and greater susceptibility to COVID-19 because of an increased prevalence of underlying health conditions that make blacks vulnerable. <br /><br />He said these negative outcomes are a legacy of discriminatory policies and practices, including redlining. "These exclusionary practices coupled with disinvestment in black and brown communities perpetuate overcrowding and deterioration of housing stock that contribute to high levels of lead exposure, segregated and underfunded schools, high dropout rates, and high unemployment and crime rates," Dunn said. <br /><br />Dunn said he is cautiously optimistic about improvement in racial disparities. He noted that the COVID-19 health crisis created a captive audience to watch news of the murder of George Floyd. "This video struck whites in a way that others haven't,” Dunn said. “Families and children were watching, and parents had to explain to their children the situation in a way that hasn't happened before."<br /><br />Dunn has been on the faculty at CSU since 2004 and is a graduate of the University’s Ph.D. program in urban studies. In addition to serving on the Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board, he also provided written testimony to President Barack Obama’s Taskforce on 21st Century Policing. His most recent book, <em>Boycotts, Busing, &amp; Beyond: The History &amp; Implications of School Desegregation in the Urban North</em>, was published by Kendall-Hunt Publishing in 2016.<br />​​​​​​​<br /><strong>About Cleveland State University</strong><br />Founded in 1964, Cleveland State University is a public research institution that provides a dynamic setting for Engaged Learning. With 17,000-plus students, ten colleges and schools and more than 175 academic programs, CSU was again chosen for 2019 as one of America’s best universities by U.S. News &amp; World Report. Find more information at <a href="http://www.csuohio.edu">www.csuohio.edu</a>.</p></div></div></div> Tue, 30 Jun 2020 14:27:02 +0000 6002238 22893 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Announces Plans for Return to Campus Fall Semester 2020 https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-announces-plans-for-return-campus-fall-semester-2020 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6 class="BasicParagraph" align="center"><em><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Data-driven plan supports full semester of hybrid learning</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br /><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>More than 50% of fall schedule to be offered on campus</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></em></h6><p><span><span><span><span>CLEVELAND (June 23, 2020) – </span></span><span><span>CSU announced today its plans to resume in-person classes at the start of the fall semester. The announcement was made by President Harlan Sands in a campus-wide communication today to the university community.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>Designed to offer a robust college experience, the plan includes maximizing the number of in-person classroom experiences that can be safely delivered, providing managed usage of faculty and staff offices to support the increased on-campus presence, residential living options, on-site access to most support services and a phased approach for resuming athletics programs.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>The CSU approach is predicated on an intensive, comprehensive “healthy campus” action plan that will require the entire on-campus community to commit to stringent guidelines and safety protocols. The plan includes wearing appropriate face coverings at all times, maintaining safe physical distances, frequent hand washing, daily health monitoring, robust testing of symptomatic students and employees, intensive contact tracing, de-densifying classroom space and resident halls, control of high foot-traffic flow, and advanced disinfecting practices. </span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>“To be successful, we must take care and do this together,” President Sands said. “All of us have a responsibility to adjust to these necessary changes and commit to embracing a culture that keeps our Viking community safe.” </span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><b><span><span>Academics</span></span></b></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>The CSU academic calendar will start as scheduled this fall. Classes will begin Monday, August 24, and continue through Friday, December 4. Final exams will take place December 7-12. The university will track progression of the pandemic and is prepared to adjust the fall calendar as necessary to keep campus safe. </span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>CSU will adopt a hybrid approach for remote teaching and learning that optimizes use of campus spaces to allow for the largest number of in-person classes. Sands said the leadership planning group engaged in extensive data analysis to assess the university’s ability to effectively minimize its campus footprint and to ensure decisions were data-driven and based upon the latest science in preventing the spread of COVID-19 and protecting the students and workforce. The group also gave consideration to the views of as many constituencies as possible, including students, faculty, professional staff, parents and other stakeholders.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>“Based on our extensive study of CSU classroom capacity, our current fall schedule and safety protocols, our current intent is to offer over 50% of our fall schedule on campus, totaling more than 1,300 classes,” Sands said. “That includes over 400 classes for degree or licensure requirements, over 450 first-year classes, and more than 500 classes that faculty believe should be delivered in person for best learning outcomes. To maintain proper physical distancing, almost all on-campus classes will have fewer than 30 students in attendance in each class section.”</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>Regarding teaching and learning, CSU will continue to work with its faculty and staff to ensure it protects their health and well-being while on campus. This will include accommodations, as appropriate, for employees at higher risk of contracting COVID-19 due to health conditions. CSU will also present flexibility for students who may at higher risk through additional online sections and remote teaching and learning options for classes held on-campus.  </span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><b><span><span>Phased return </span></span></b></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>Over the next two months, CSU will work toward transitioning support services and ensuring appropriate staffing levels and resources are available to support the increased on-campus presence. As CSU’s academic mission is its number one priority, all on-campus events will be restricted and group meeting size will be limited. To limit the campus footprint, all support services and administrative functions that can effectively be delivered remotely will remain in place for the fall semester. </span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><b><span><span>Testing</span></span></b></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>Cleveland State is working with health care leaders and public health officials to develop a COVID-19 testing protocol for symptomatic individuals.  CSU’s follow-up plan will also include symptom tracking and contact tracing. Dedicated quarantine areas will be established for on-campus residents or those who cannot quarantine at home if required.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><b><span><span>On-campus housing</span></span></b></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>A full residential experience will be offered this fall, with strict de-densification guidelines that provide for social and physical distancing and enhanced cleaning and sanitizing protocols. For fall semester, all students will be assigned individual, private bedrooms in Euclid Commons or Fenn Tower. <span>Priority will be given to students with a course or courses on campus in fall, students whose scholarship is tied to living on campus, and returning students who have already applied for on-campus housing. Students will be expected to fulfill responsibilities and expectations for keeping their rooms clean and safe, as well as mitigation of risk, especially in common areas, hallways and bathrooms. </span>Move-in will be staggered to help us best adhere to physical distancing protocols. Dining and retail options for students will be adjusted as necessary to ensure healthy behaviors.  </span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><b><span><span>Campus safety </span></span></b></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>To accommodate an increased on-campus presence, the university is restructuring classrooms and other spaces to allow for appropriate physical distancing, including relocating some classes and other activities to larger spaces and staggering days and times to allow for smaller group sizes. All students, staff, faculty, vendors and visitors will be required to take an online health assessment every day before coming to campus and will be required  to wear masks at all times while on campus. Students, faculty and staff will be asked to demonstrate their commitment to a safe on-campus community through a social contract that commits all community member to behaving responsibly. </span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>To further decrease physical spread of the virus, handwashing and hand sanitizing stations will be located across campus, and cleaning cycles will be intensified so that classrooms, common areas and high-touch surfaces can be appropriately sanitized. Use of plexiglas shields in areas with high potential for person-to-person contact will be prevalent. Additionally, CSU will provide directional signage to control foot-traffic flow through buildings and on campus pathways, invest in signage and educational materials that clearly spell out protocols and safety directives, and employ student “Safety Ambassadors” to help educate others on safety procedures and promote positive physical distancing behaviors across the campus.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><b><span><span>Athletics</span></span></b></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>Beginning July 15, CSU Athletics will employ a phased approach to resuming team activities beginning with four fall team sports: men’s and women’s soccer, volleyball, and cross country. The initial cohort of approximately 85 student athletes will complete an extended pre-participation physical exam by the Cleveland Clinic Sports Health Center staff and will be closely monitored as training progresses.  </span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>“It’s critical we create a culture where safety is top of mind,” said Sands. “It’s up to us to keep ourselves and others safe.<span> This will only work if we each do our part.”</span></span></span></span></span>​​​​​​​</p><p class="BasicParagraph"><span><span><span><span><b><span><span><span>About Cleveland State University </span></span></span></b></span></span></span></span></p><p class="BasicParagraph"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Founded in 1964, Cleveland State University is a public research institution that provides a dynamic setting for Engaged Learning. With 17,000-plus students, ten colleges and schools and more than 175 academic programs, CSU was again chosen for 2020 as one of America’s best universities by U.S. News &amp; World Report. Find more information at <a href="http://www.csuohio.edu">www.csuohio.edu</a>. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p><p class="BasicParagraph" align="center"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>### </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div></div></div> Mon, 22 Jun 2020 20:03:31 +0000 6001031 22888 at https://www.csuohio.edu Center for Economic Development Assesses Impact of COVID-19 on the Economy https://www.csuohio.edu/news/center-for-economic-development-assesses-impact-covid-19-economy <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><span><span><span>The Center for Economic Development has released a new research brief that examines the state of the economy in the U.S. and Northeast Ohio pre-pandemic and provides an analysis of the immediate impacts of the social distancing measures and mandated closures that occurred as the COVID-19 pandemic spread. This new evidence shows that the Northeast Ohio economy was headed for an economic slowdown even before the COVID-19 pandemic emerged.</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>“The economic repercussions of COVID-19 effects all people, businesses, governments and organizations, and will have long-lasting effects on our community,” Dr. Iryna Demko, one of the authors of the report shared. “While the actual impact will not be known for some time, it is my hope this research will provide policymakers with better data to address the real challenges we are already facing.”</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>With the Governor’s stay-at-home order, many businesses were forced to close, causing a spike in initial unemployment claims from workers who were furloughed or laid off. In Northeast Ohio alone, over 1 million people have filed first-time unemployment claims since mid-March, with the most affected industries being auto manufacturing, entertainment and arts, accommodation, and food services. </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>Additionally, with low revenue and high unemployment, there has been a significant decline in consumer spending, with the Index of Consumer Spending dropping 18 points in April alone. This decline is particularly concerning given that consumer spending accounts for the majority of GDP growth in the U.S. </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>The brief argues that as the economy gradually reopens, the workplace will look different due to continued social distancing measures, including masks, temperature checks, and frequent sanitizing. These changes may reduce the use of certain services due to safety concerns or lead to some industries, such as concerts and sporting events, taking much longer to reopen fully. </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>“Overall, the culmination of these impacts may cause a larger and longer slowdown, resulting in a lengthy recovery,” Demko adds.</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>This research was conducted with support from the George Gund Foundation and the U.S. Economic Development Administration. The brief, <i>From Economic Slowdown to Recession</i>, was released by CSU’s Center for Economic Development earlier this month.</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>Learn more about the research brief </span><a href="https://engagedscholarship.csuohio.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2653&amp;context=urban_facpub">here</a><span>.</span></span></span></p></div></div></div> Mon, 22 Jun 2020 13:37:56 +0000 2510390 22881 at https://www.csuohio.edu Special Executive Committee Meeting of the CSU Board of Trustees – June 22, 2020 https://www.csuohio.edu/news/special-executive-committee-meeting-csu-board-trustees-%E2%80%93-june-22-2020 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>The Executive Committee of the Cleveland State University Board of Trustees will hold a special meeting on Monday, June 22, 2020 at 1:30 p.m. The committee will adjourn into executive session to consider personnel-related matters, including the employment and compensation of public employees. The meeting will be held via ZOOM.</p><p>To join the meeting, please click the following link: <a target="_blank" href="https://csuohio.zoom.us/j/92583897220">https://csuohio.zoom.us/j/92583897220</a></p><p>To join via audio only, please dial: 929-436-2866; meeting ID: 92583897220#</p></div></div></div> Fri, 19 Jun 2020 16:40:14 +0000 6001031 22878 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Team Leads Smart City Catalog Project https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-team-leads-smart-city-catalog-project <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><span><span><span><span>Ph.D. student Cait Kennedy and assistant professor Dr. Obed Pasha from CSU’s Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs have led a project supported by the Cleveland Foundation, Cleveland State University, and the IoT Collaborative called the “Smart Cities Catalog Project.”</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>The goal of the project is to gather information on smart city projects and publish the results online so public sector organizations can better work together to solve community problems. “Smart cities” initiatives are projects that use advanced technology to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, sustainability, and equity of public services. </span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>The catalog provides opportunities for public service organizations to pursue funding opportunities together and increase the visibility of their smart cities projects.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>“The catalog project responds to a specific need shared by public sector leaders and helps bring organizations closer to improve the quality of life in communities across the country, as well as here in the Greater Cleveland area,” explained Pasha.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>The team began by conducting orientation interviews with public sector leaders in Greater Cleveland to understand the existing landscape, the needs that can be addressed by the catalog, and the opportunities for the initiatives to grow. From there, the catalog idea was presented to a public sector advisory committee, after which the team began to build out the catalog.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>“The interviews with the public sector leaders were great because I not only got to build a network, but I was able to see how public service organizations have different purposes but deploy similar technologies for similar end goals,” said Kennedy.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>The future of the project will go beyond its adoptions to evaluate its impacts and if they are effective for the purposes intended. Additionally, there will be research to see the drivers of innovation and how to create an environment where innovation is accepted and accelerated.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>Projects housed in the catalog come from regional public and nonprofit organizations. For examples, CWRU’s project, alpha</span><span><span>-Satellite, aims at providing real-time COVID-19 risk assessment to assist individuals and communities with actionable strategies to slow the spread of COVID-19.</span></span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>Similarly, countsupplies.org, a project started at CSU, allows hospitals to quickly and easily register and update their inventory of ventilators both in use, and available for use, on a daily basis. This project will help mitigate the threats of COVID-19.</span></span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span><span>Explore the Smart Cities Catalog Project and the catalog itself </span><a href="https://iotcollaborative.org/smart-city-catalog-overview/projects/">here</a><span>.</span></span></span></span></p></div></div></div> Thu, 18 Jun 2020 19:54:49 +0000 6001031 22877 at https://www.csuohio.edu Thirty-Year-Old Manuscript Finally Sees the Light of Day as Published E-book https://www.csuohio.edu/news/thirty-year-old-manuscript-finally-sees-light-day-published-e-book <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p class="MsoNormal"><span>CLEVELAND (Jun 16, 2020) – Bill Barrow, Head of Special Collections at Cleveland State University’s Michael Schwartz Library, has played a key role in the publishing of a work on the history and impact of Cleveland’s University Circle that was thirty years in the making. Written by Dr. Darwin Stapleton, the former Executive Director of the Rockefeller Archive Center in New York, <i>The History of University Circle in Cleveland: Community, Philanthropy, and Planning</i> details the 200-year history of Cleveland’s hub of medicine, education and culture.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span>In the early 1990’s, Barrow attended the Western Reserve Study Symposium when Dr. Stapleton was giving a seminar. In it, Dr. Stapleton mentioned an unpublished manuscript he had written on the history of University Circle. Years later, Barrow remembered that an unpublished manuscript on University Circle was out there and contacted Stapleton, asking if he would be willing to revise and publish the work, to which Stapleton graciously agreed. </span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span>“There just aren’t enough good books on University Circle in the world,” Barrow says. “If we hadn’t found Dr. Stapleton’s work, who knows if it would have seen the light of day.”</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span>Detailing the district’s bicentennial history,<i> </i>Stapleton’s book charts University Circle’s role in the establishment of Cleveland, its status as Cleveland’s center of philanthropy and its storied planning process. From its start as a small but diverse suburb of Cleveland to the bustling, charismatic uptown community that it has become, the book encompasses the many changes that a neighborhood as old as this one has undergone. </span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span>Published in 2020, <i>The History of University Circle in Cleveland: Community, Philanthropy, and Planning</i> is available to the public as an e-book on the Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Library’s Pressbooks website: </span><a href="http://pressbooks.ulib.csuohio.edu/"><span>pressbooks.ulib.csuohio.edu</span></a><span>, under Barbara Loomis. This book is also part of the Cleveland Memory Project, an online database of historical texts and images regarding the Greater Cleveland area.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><b><span>About Cleveland State University</span></b><span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span>Founded in 1964, Cleveland State University is a public research institution that provides a dynamic setting for Engaged Learning. With 17,000-plus students, ten colleges and schools and more than 175 academic programs, CSU was again chosen for 2019 as one of America’s best universities by U.S. News &amp; World Report. Find more information at </span><a target="_blank" href="http://www.csuohio.edu/"><span>www.csuohio.edu</span></a><span>.</span></p><p class="BasicParagraph" align="center"><b><span>###</span></b></p></div></div></div> Tue, 16 Jun 2020 20:25:24 +0000 6001031 22872 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Student Team Wins First Place in Fluid Power Vehicle Competition https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-student-team-wins-first-place-in-fluid-power-vehicle-competition <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><img alt="Fluid-Powered Vehicle" height="407" width="650" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/Fluid-Powered%20Vehicle_Web.jpg" title="" />​​​​​​​</p><p>A team of students from Cleveland State University’s Washkewicz College of Engineering placed first in the 2020 Fluid Power Vehicle Competition presented by the National Fluid Power Association. The team, led by Ellen Rea, along with team members Jake Landry, Angela Rodriguez, Sarah Smith, and Naik Yusufi, won for their design of a fluid-powered bicycle. The team was advised by assistant professor Bogdan Kozul.  </p><p>Design and construction of the fluid-powered bicycle started in the fall of 2020. The team decided to start with a new design, in contrast to the prior year’s vehicle, for which another CSU team had won first place in the 2019 competition. </p><p>The new design included a custom carbon fiber frame, integrated hydraulic reservoir and a new hydraulic circuit featuring intuitive rider controls and regenerative braking. It was a dramatic change from the prior year’s vehicle.</p><p>“We were able to integrate many component mounts into the hydraulic reservoir, so we didn’t require a bunch of separate brackets,” explained Rea, who is also a spring class of 2020 university valedictorian. “Through doing that, we got rid of some weight and also made everything more streamlined.”</p><p>As for future plans for the vehicle, that decision is up to next year’s design team. The bicycle will be used as a learning piece for the future team, but will also to be taken to trade shows. Sponsoring companies have also used the bicycle to demonstrate their support for colleges and universities. </p><p>“This was an outstanding group of kids to work with and I enjoyed every minute of it. Every student had a unique characteristic, that when put together, they could hit a home run on any project,” said Kozul.</p><p>Watch the vehicle in action <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yeWw5Oetmg&amp;feature=youtu.be">here</a>. </p></div></div></div> Mon, 08 Jun 2020 17:00:46 +0000 6002238 22847 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Announces New “2-for-1 Tuition Promise” for Incoming Freshmen https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-announces-new-%E2%80%9C2-for-1-tuition-promise%E2%80%9D-for-incoming-freshmen <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6 class="BasicParagraph"><em><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Also Introduces Incentive Program for Returning Students </span></span></span></span></span></span></span>​​​​​​​</em></h6><p><span><span><span>CLEVELAND (June 1, 2020) –</span> <span>CSU announced today several creative new student support programs that will help current and future students succeed. CSU’s renewed commitment to student success, especially in a time of economic stress for families and students across Ohio, demonstrates its continuing focus on providing pathways for upward mobility and creating a talent pipeline for our community.</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>The <b>“2</b></span><b><i><span>-for-1 Tuition Promise” for Incoming Freshmen</span></i></b><span> will provide all students </span><span>who enroll at CSU as new freshmen and successfully complete Fall Semester 2020 with a GPA of 2.75 or better, to enroll in Spring Semester 2021 tuition free, after other financial aid has been applied.</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>The initiative is designed to provide additional financial support and encouragement at a time when many families are struggling, and also to incentivize students to pursue their college dreams now.</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>“We are acutely aware that this is no ordinary time, and the financial, emotional and health-related pressures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic are putting significant additional stress on high school seniors and their families,” said Cleveland State President Harlan Sands. “Our 2-for-1 Tuition Promise is specifically designed to make the entire college-going process easier, while reducing the financial burden for families and incentivizing students to succeed.”</span></span></span></p><p class="CxSpMiddle"><span>“This is not a typical year for any of us,” Sands added. “Our aim is to ensure that a transition to CSU includes a strong financial incentive for these students and families, especially during this time of uncertainty.”</span></p><p class="CxSpMiddle"><span>For more information on the 2-for-1 Tuition Promise, including eligibility information, visit <a target="_blank" title="https://www.csuohio.edu/admissions/2-for-1-tuition-promise" href="https://www.csuohio.edu/admissions/2-for-1-tuition-promise">https://www.csuohio.edu/admissions/2-for-1-tuition-promise</a>. </span></p><p class="BasicParagraph"><strong><em><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Investing in the Success of All CSU Students</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></em></strong></p><p><span><span><span><span>In addition to the 2-for-1 promise for freshmen, CSU continues to make investments in the success of continuing students and graduate students. In 2020, CSU will launch several new initiatives alongside existing programs to ensure access to higher education is affordable:</span></span></span></span></p><ul><li><span><span><span><span>Degree-seeking undergraduate students returning to CSU for the Fall 2020 semester and enrolled for at least 12 credits and earning a 3.0 GPA or higher, will receive a $150 Campus Bookstore credit for Spring Semester 2021.</span></span></span></span></li><li><span><span><span><span>Non-Ohio residents interested in earning a graduate degree will pay in-state tuition at CSU if they have earned a bachelor’s degree from an Ohio college or university.</span></span></span></span></li><li><span><span><span><span>CSU considers military service members on active duty, as well as their spouses and dependents, as Ohio residents for the purposes of qualifying for in-state tuition.</span></span></span></span></li><li><span><span><span><span>CSU will invest an additional $2 million in need-based financial aid for the 2020-2021 academic year.</span></span></span></span></li><li><span><span><span><span>CSU invests over $11 million anually in scholarhips and grants for returning students, including Radiance Scholarships for students within 60 credits of graduating. Thanks to the generosity of CSU’s large donor base, the Radiance program has raised nearly $10 million since 2011 to keep upper level students on track to graduation.</span></span></span></span></li><li><span><span><span><span>Through the Federal CARES Act and private donations, CSU has already awarded over $4.1 million in <a href="https://www.csuohio.edu/liftupvikes/liftupvikes">Lift Up Vikes Grants</a> to continuing undergraduate, graduate and law school students.</span></span></span></span></li></ul><p>President Sands discussed the new 2-for-1 Tuition Promise with Fox 8 News on Friday, June 5. Click <a target="_blank" href="http://csuohio.us/2UdvbdY">here</a> for the interview.</p><p class="BasicParagraph"><span><span><span><span><b><span>About Cleveland State University </span></b></span></span></span></span></p><p class="BasicParagraph"><span><span><span><span><span>Founded in 1964, Cleveland State University is a public research institution that provides a dynamic setting for Engaged Learning. With 17,000-plus students, ten colleges and schools and more than 175 academic programs, CSU was again chosen for 2020 as one of America’s best universities by U.S. News &amp; World Report. Find more information at <a href="http://www.csuohio.edu">www.csuohio.edu</a>. </span></span></span></span></span></p><p class="BasicParagraph" align="center"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>### </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div></div></div> Mon, 01 Jun 2020 17:22:41 +0000 6001031 22841 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Campus Sustains Damage from Protests https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-campus-sustains-damage-from-protests <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Employees and Students Safe</h6><p>Cleveland State University’s campus sustained damage overnight Saturday from protests that spread throughout much of downtown. None of the students or staff on campus were injured and CSU Police were present to ensure their safety.</p><p>Four CSU buildings along Euclid Avenue sustained minimal damage, including broken windows and graffiti. CSU Facilities Services employees were on site Sunday morning to assess the damage and make needed repairs.</p><p>Until further notice, only designated essential employees should be on campus. Any students, faculty or staff on campus or in other areas of downtown are reminded to adhere to the City of Cleveland’s curfew, from noon Sunday to 8 a.m. Monday, and to shelter in place during that time. Any members of the CSU community downtown who have imminent concerns for their safety should call 911 or contact CSU Police at 216-687-2020.</p><p>“The safety and security of our students, faculty and staff is our most important priority,” said Cleveland State President Harlan Sands, who visited the campus this morning.</p><p>Cleveland State University is a public urban research university with an enrollment of more than 15,000 students and 1,200 faculty and staff.</p><p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Sun, 31 May 2020 15:13:07 +0000 6000933 22837 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Announces Short-term Measures, Additional Investments in Faculty & Students https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-announces-short-term-measures-additional-investments-in-faculty-students <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><span><span><span>Cleveland State University has announced a series of actions to address the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on fiscal year 2020 and 2021 budgets, and to position the university to succeed and grow in a new, post-COVID environment.</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>“To create a stronger CSU that best prepares us for post-COVID higher education realities, we need to take both immediate action and plan for additional, near-term changes that reinforces our commitment to engaged learning and service to our students as our highest priorities,” said CSU President Harlan Sands. “At times like these, we also need to continue to invest in ourselves in ways that advance our shared future. We are doing that today.”</span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>CSU’s finances are being impacted by reductions in state funding, significantly reduced campus operations since early March, anticipated enrollment declines in fall 2020 and additional operating expenses from the pandemic response and shifting more than 2,000 courses to online teaching and learning. Fiscal year 2020 losses already exceed $8 million, and projected deficits for fiscal year 2021 could exceed $37 million. </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>“The CSU Board of Trustees fully supports the recommendations made by President Sands, and looks forward to working with him as he executes the plans laid out. We are confident that CSU will continue to be the anchor and beacon institution Cleveland needs to achieve our common goals,” said CSU Board of Trustees Chairman David Gunning. </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>Actions that will be implemented immediately include:</span></span></span></p><ul><li class="CxSpMiddle"><b><span>4-week staff furlough. </span></b><span>Furloughed employees will continue to receive all CSU-provided benefits in addition to being eligible for unemployment insurance benefits and Federal CARES Act support.</span></li><li class="CxSpMiddle"><b><span>Temporary, stratified administrative salary reductions. </span></b><span>For a period of six months, pay reductions will be implemented, as follows:</span><ul><li class="CxSpMiddle"><span>President – 12.5%</span></li><li class="CxSpMiddle"><span>Salaries of $200,000 or greater – 10% </span></li><li class="CxSpMiddle"><span>Salaries of $150,000 - $199,999 – 8%</span></li><li class="CxSpMiddle"><span>Salaries less than $150,000 – 6%</span></li></ul></li><li class="CxSpMiddle"><b><span>Hiring freeze.</span></b><span> Recruitment efforts will be suspended for approximately 70 currently open staff positions.</span></li><li class="CxSpMiddle"><b><span>Reduced discretionary spending. </span></b><span>Non-critical spending from discretionary accounts such as supplies and travel will be heavily restricted.</span></li></ul><p><span><span><span>In addition to these immediate measures, <b>CSU has created four areas for comprehensive review and study</b> to identify further opportunities for growth, savings and improved efficiency. </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>While CSU’s finances are being directly impacted by the pandemic, the University is also taking measures to preserve its financial viability and invest in the future. </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>“Even in these challenging times, making strategic investments is critical to our long-term growth and success,” said President Sands. </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><b><span>CSU reaffirmed its commitment to hire up to 30 additional facult</span></b><span>y in areas of growth such as computer science, information technology, health care and biomedical research, and introduced <b>a new student recruitment and progression initiative called “the CSU 2-for-1 Tuition Promise”</b>, where all incoming freshman will receive full funding for spring 2021 tuition after successful completion of the fall semester. Full details on the 2-for-1 Tuition Promise will be coming soon.  </span></span></span></p><p><span><span><span>Details of these actions were shared with the CSU campus community in a message from President Sands today, following yesterday's meeting of the university’s Board of Trustees.</span></span></span></p><p class="rtecenter"><span><span><span>​​​​​​​###</span></span></span></p></div></div></div> Fri, 22 May 2020 01:17:17 +0000 6000933 22817 at https://www.csuohio.edu Cleveland State Places Second in OWEA Student Design Competition https://www.csuohio.edu/news/cleveland-state-places-second-in-owea-student-design-competition <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>At the beginning of 2020, two teams from Cleveland State University competed against fellow engineers from Case Western Reserve and Kent State University in the Ohio Water Environmental Association Student Design Competition. One of CSU’s teams, titled “Changing Tides,” placed second in the competition.</p><p>Teams in the competition were presented with a problem by Doug Dietzel, environmental manager for the City of Lorain. CSU’s teams were tasked with finding a solution to the continual flooding problem in Martin Run, located in Lorain County.</p><p>“I feel I have developed a better understanding of just how complex real world problems can be especially when the public is being affected by the problem first-hand,” said team member Sam Harbol.</p><p>Team Changing Tides, a joint team from the Environmental Science and Environmental Studies programs, created a plan to address the flooding that included policy initiatives that promote stormwater sensitive urban development as well as physical interventions to reduce backups at the mouth of the run, to ensure consistent flow.</p><p>After the competition, Doug Dietzel asked Team Changing Tides for their report so he can present it to the City of Lorain. Additionally, the team was invited to attend a statewide meeting in September.</p><p>“It afforded me a rare opportunity where I was able apply what I learned in class and through my personal research to a project in real time,” added team member Martin Maratani.</p></div></div></div> Tue, 19 May 2020 14:16:35 +0000 6002238 22811 at https://www.csuohio.edu The Relationship Between Paid Sick Leave and Sleep https://www.csuohio.edu/news/relationship-between-paid-sick-leave-and-sleep <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Dr. Cyleste Collins Leads Study on the Relationship Between Paid Sick Leave and Sleep</h6><p>Dr. Cyleste Collins, an assistant professor in Cleveland State University’s School of Social Work, led a study analyzing the relationship between sleep quality and access to paid sick leave. Findings show that there is a relationship between the two, but that it is a part of a larger set of occupational variables that have an impact on sleep.</p><p>“Lack of paid sick leave is related to sleep in specific ways and if we take that further, it becomes a barrier to people’s sleep,” said Collins. “Having a well-rested workforce is very important for productivity, performance and overall health."</p><p>The study found that people without paid sick leave reported having significantly more trouble staying asleep and feeling rested than those with paid sick leave after controlling for a range of demographic, work, and other variables related to sleep. They also tended to report having more trouble feeling rested. This, Collins said, is a social justice issue, because those who have less access to paid sick leave tend to also be those most affected by health disparities.</p><p>“Past research has found paid sick leave, or the absence of it, is linked to health consequences, financial worries and psychological distress,” Collins added. “This is important for organizations to consider because it can cost more in the end to have a work force without paid sick leave that is unrested, unhealthy and distressed.”</p><p>Collins’ findings were published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine earlier this month. The paper, “<a href="https://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/9000/Paid_Sick_Leave_and_Sleep__An_Analysis_of_U_S_.98217.aspx">Paid Sick Leave and Sleep: An Analysis of U.S. Adult Workers</a>,” was coauthored by LeeAnn DeRigne, associate professor in the Phyllis and Harvey Sandler</p><p>School of Social Work at Florida Atlantic University, Rong Bai, a Ph.D. student in the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Sciences at Case Western Reserve University and Patricia Stoddard Dare, professor of social work at CSU.</p><p>###</p></div></div></div> Tue, 19 May 2020 14:08:55 +0000 6002238 22810 at https://www.csuohio.edu Gia Paulovich Wins a Gold Award at the Cleveland Addy Awards https://www.csuohio.edu/news/gia-paulovich-wins-gold-award-cleveland-addy-awards <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Cleveland State University student Gia Paulovich won a Gold Award in the Integrated Brand Content Campaign category at the 2020 Addy Awards, presented by the Cleveland Chapter of the American Advertising Federation. Her award-winning project was created in her Integrated Design Strategies class.</p><p>Paulovich created HUMN, a gender-inclusive period care product, along with developing a packaging suite and marketing campaign for the brand. The idea came out of a class project which called on students to propose a new direct-to-consumer specialized online retailer and create a visual identity and basic group of communication elements to promote a product and brand for the retailer. </p><p>Paulovich will next present HUMN at the national Addy Awards and hopes to use the experience to further her skills and reach her broader goal of promoting community wellness through design.</p><p>In addition to her project, Paulovich created a website through Creative Babes Cleveland called <a href="https://www.creativebabesmarket.com/">creativebabesmarket.com</a>. The website seeks to advertise and market local business owners and manufacturers in attempt to urge Cleveland communities to shop local.</p><p>She is also part of the CSU research team that developed <a href="http://drughelp.care/auth/search">Drughelp.care</a>, a free website to help those in the community affected by opioids. The site allows drug treatment providers to list the number of open treatment slots daily. The site is fully searchable and quickly and efficiently matches substance users with the best available treatment services.</p><p>“I am committed to using my design skills to help make my community a better place,” Paulovich adds.</p></div></div></div> Thu, 14 May 2020 00:40:08 +0000 6002238 22800 at https://www.csuohio.edu Ronnie Dunn Named to the Ohio Minority Health Strike Force https://www.csuohio.edu/news/ronnie-dunn-named-ohio-minority-health-strike-force <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Dr. Ronnie Dunn, interim chief diversity officer and associate professor of urban studies at Cleveland State University, has been appointed to the Ohio Minority Health Strike Force. The group has been created by the State of Ohio to assess the disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on African Americans and other people of color and make recommendations on how to prevent further spread of the disease in these communities. In Ohio, African Americans make up 13 percent of the population, however 24.1 percent of COVID-19 patients in the state are African American.</p><p>“We must recognize that there are many Ohioans who have an increased risk of being disproportionately impacted by COVID-19, and we must do everything we can to protect all Ohioans from this pandemic,” said Governor Mike DeWine in a statement announcing the Strike Force.</p><p>“The increased rate of infection in the African American community is a symptom of the broader disparities in health care access and other structural inequities faced by minorities locally and nationally,” Dunn added. “It is my hope this Strike Force can present comprehensive reforms which will serve as a model for addressing broader inequalities in our health care and socioeconomic systems.”<br /> <br />Ronnie Dunn has been on the faculty at CSU since 2004 and is a graduate of the University’s Ph.D. program in urban studies. He also serves on the Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board and provided written testimony to President Barack Obama’s Taskforce on 21st Century Policing. His most recent book, Boycotts, Busing, &amp; Beyond: The History &amp; Implications of School Desegregation in the Urban North, was published by Kendall-Hunt Publishing in 2016.</p><p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Thu, 07 May 2020 18:48:16 +0000 6000933 22793 at https://www.csuohio.edu School of Nursing Faculty and Students Assist in Community Response to COVID-19 https://www.csuohio.edu/news/school-nursing-faculty-and-students-assist-in-community-response-covid-19 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, it has had a different type of impact on faculty and students within Cleveland State University’s School of Nursing. Assistant Clinical Professor Mary Hasenstaub, APRN, DNP and Ph.D. student Raquel Rodriguez have found themselves having to balance being a professor or student with service as a front-line health care worker in hospitals and clinics in the area.</p><p>Dr. Hasenstaub is a Board-Certified Family Nurse Practitioner working in a federally qualified health center. Before the pandemic, she saw between 15-20 patients a day who were experiencing both acute and chronic medical conditions like diabetes or heart disease, along with handling pediatrics and the facility’s Immigration Immunization Clinic. With the development of COVID-19, her workplace quickly converted patients to telehealth to limit incoming traffic while in-person appointments have been more spread out to limit the amount of contact with other patients.</p><p>“We have been strictly following both CDC and Board of Health guidelines,” said <br />Dr. Hasenstaub. “We have made the decision to order a respiratory panel to test patients for potential COVID-19 infection to not overload the rest of the system. If results appear negative, then we recommend further testing and provide follow-ups throughout the process.”</p><p>Dr. Hasenstaub noted that this pandemic needs to be taken seriously considering the amount of unknown aspects of the disease and that many don’t understand the science behind the virus. As an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, she has learned that it is important to continue moving forward and to take actions based on the best possible information available, while doing everything one can to keep themselves and their patients safe. As a professor, Dr. Hasenstaub explained how important it is to assist individuals that are underserved or are health illiterate in better understanding what is happening and what they can do to contribute to community health. </p><p>“Take the opportunity to donate or reach out to those who need help,” she added. “You don’t have to do a lot. We can all do something small to help each other.”</p><p>Like Dr. Hasenstaub, Raquel Rodriguez has been working on the frontlines in a local ICU where she attends to COVID-19 patients. She graduated from CSU with a bachelor’s in nursing in 2005 and a master’s in nursing education in 2008. In addition to her doctoral studies and work as a nurse, Ms. Rodriguez serves as a clinical experience coordinator for the School of Nursing, where she assists with clinical placements and processes for undergraduate students and clinical instructors.</p><p>Before COVID-19, Ms. Rodriguez was a staff nurse in a cardiovascular surgery unit in which she took care of surgical and intensive care patients. Now, her unit is for patients who are suspected to be positive for COVID-19 or for those who have already tested positive.</p><p>“Before the pandemic, we could check in on our patients when they needed us, and spend as much time with them as they needed to talk about their status and situation,” Ms. Rodriguez shared. “Now, we have to communicate as much as we can to the patients in a limited amount of time and tell them we will not be able to return to their room unless it fits into the specific time frame allowed.”</p><p>Ms. Rodriguez explained that though the time with patients has been reduced, they can still check their vital signs from outside the room and make sure that there haven’t been significant changes to their health since the last visit. The patients and nurses can also communicate via a call bell, and if the patient needs anything, a list is made to be brought to the room at the next assigned time.</p><p>“Nothing is textbook, we are going by the moment,” said Ms. Rodriguez. “Everything we have been taught has changed, we are just learning as we go.”</p><p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Thu, 30 Apr 2020 14:26:47 +0000 6000933 22785 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Announces Additional $6 Million in Direct Aid to Students https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-announces-additional-6-million-in-direct-aid-students <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Funds will support Lift Up Vikes! emergency grant program</h6><p>Beginning Monday, Cleveland State University will award an additional $6 million in need-based emergency grants to help CSU students manage financial challenges occurring due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Grants of up to $2,500 will be available through our Lift Up Vikes! program, an existing student support initiative which provides emergency grants to CSU students. Funding for this additional distribution will come from both recently-allocated Federal CARES Act resources and our generous donors. These grants can be used for expenses such as housing, food, course materials, technology and childcare. </p><p>“Getting funds to our students quickly and efficiently is our highest priority,” said CSU President Harlan M. Sands. “And helping students reduce financial obstacles is critical if we are to keep students on a pathway to graduate.”</p><p>Emergency grants will be available to students through the CSU Office of Financial Aid. Eligibility will depend on student circumstances. Fully-automated grant applications will be available beginning Monday, April 27, directions and updates will be posted to <a target="_blank" href="https://www.csuohio.edu/coronavirus-update/coronavirus-update">https://www.csuohio.edu/coronavirus-update/coronavirus-update</a>. </p><p>The CSU Lift Up Vikes! program has been providing emergency grants since its establishment in 2019, and new contibutions from a variety of donors and supporters since the outbreak of COVID-19 have increased availability of funding. Students can apply through <a href="https://campusnet.csuohio.edu/">CampusNet</a>.</p><p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Thu, 23 Apr 2020 18:59:05 +0000 6000933 22762 at https://www.csuohio.edu WCSB Receives Grant to Improve Broadcast Operations https://www.csuohio.edu/news/wcsb-receives-grant-improve-broadcast-operations <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Grant will fund cost of new antenna</h6> <p>Cleveland State’s radio station and student organization, WCSB 89.3 FM, has been awarded a $2,000 grant by the College Radio Foundation in their efforts to replace the station’s 15-year-old antenna. The grant will help defray costs and enhance signal strength. De-icers will also be attached to the antenna, which is located on the roof of Rhodes Tower, to prevent damage from the elements without adding a significant amount of weight.<br /> <br /> The College Radio Foundation (CRF) works to support non-commercial college radio stations, and its students, around the United States. The foundation accelerates the development of student broadcasters, inspiring them to reach their potential through college radio. The CRF encourages colleges to increase their listener base, while building career skills for students and providing entertainment to the listening audience.</p> <p>Licensed to broadcast in 1976, WCSB 89.3 FM is CSU’s student-run radio station, broadcasting 24/7, every day of the year. WCSB encourages CSU students, faculty, staff and the Cleveland community to discover new genres of music and to listen to programming they may have never heard before. WCSB provides alternative programming that cannot be found on commercial radio. Those interested can listen to WCSB at 89.3 FM in the Cleveland area or stream the live broadcast from <a href="http://www.WCSB.org">www.WCSB.org</a>.</p> <p>Radio programs are hosted by CSU students and community members and include music, talk shows and public affairs programs. New student members of the station become apprentices where they are trained on operation of the station’s equipment, learn FCC rules and regulations and gain knowledge on how to produce and be responsible for their own radio programs. Students interested in more behind-the-scenes work can also help the station with refiling music, assisting with station events, working with music venues, marketing, promotions and creating Public Service Announcements. Membership is open to all CSU students. Interested individuals can apply by visiting <a href="http://www.WCSB.org">www.WCSB.org</a>.</p></div></div></div> Mon, 20 Apr 2020 18:43:52 +0000 6002238 22757 at https://www.csuohio.edu Levin College of Urban Affairs Named One of the Nation’s Best https://www.csuohio.edu/news/levin-college-urban-affairs-named-one-nation%E2%80%99s-best <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Urban Planning program ranked #3 in the U.S. in latest <em>U.S. News</em> rankings</h6> <p>The Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University has been named as one of the best in the nation in U.S. News and World Report’s <a href="https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools">2021 Guide to the Best Graduate Schools</a>, with its rankings improving significantly across the board.</p> <p>The College’s Master’s Degree program in Urban Planning and Policy was ranked number 3 in the U.S., formerly number 5, while its programs in Local Government Management and Nonprofit Management were 13th and 20th, formerly 14th and 21st, respectively. Overall, Levin was ranked 58th among all public affairs graduate schools in the country.</p> <p>“We are honored to receive this recognition, and I would like to thank all of our faculty and staff for their tremendous efforts to deliver high quality, experience-based education,” notes Roland V. Anglin, dean of the College. “Levin is committed to preparing our next generation of civic leaders, while also helping to advance cities through sustainable and equitable economic and social development.”</p> <p>The Levin College of Urban Affairs offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees in a wide range of majors, including urban studies, public administration, urban planning, environmental studies and management. It’s scholars and research centers also conduct relevant, applied research, and partner with a wide variety of community organizations and governments to assist in improving service delivery, community development and economic development in Northeast Ohio and beyond. Graduates of the College have gone on to serve in high level positions at the local, state, national and international level and are on the front lines of modern policymaking.</p> <p>“Particularly at this time, given the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever that governments and administrators have the tools and skills necessary to make the best decisions for the maximum benefit of all citizens,” Anglin adds. “Through its teaching, research and outreach efforts, the Levin College strives to be a positive force in the effort to create better, more-responsive government.”</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Fri, 17 Apr 2020 15:15:42 +0000 6000933 22747 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Hosts Virtual Event Featuring Aparna Bawa https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-hosts-virtual-event-featuring-aparna-bawa <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Zoom chief legal officer discusses the new normal of communication and conferencing</h6> <p>Aparna Bawa, the chief legal officer at Zoom, will be the featured guest at a virtual event hosted by Harlan Sands, president of Cleveland State University, and Lee Fisher, dean of CSU’s Cleveland Marshall College of Law, on Friday, April 17. Bawa will discuss the legal issues and additional challenges that have arisen as nearly all Americans have “gone remote,” and will provide insights on Zoom’s efforts to help lead the transformation of online communication in a COVID-19 world.</p> <p>The event will be held via Zoom at 12 p.m. To receive the log-in information and password please contact Holli Goodman at <a href="mailto:h.goodman@csuohio.edu">h.goodman@csuohio.edu</a>. Bawa will speak in Dean Fisher’s Leadership and Law class and given the expanding use of Zoom and remote teaching and learning at CSU and beyond, the law school is opening the class for the entire CSU community to join.</p> <p>Bawa, a graduate of Harvard Law School, may very well be the busiest lawyer in the world right now. She has a special expertise in building infrastructure for rapidly growing technology companies as they scale, and no company has scaled more quickly in the past eight weeks than Zoom. </p> <p>The company is currently working with 90,000 schools across 20 countries to help children continue their education remotely. To put this growth in context, in December of 2019, the number of daily meeting participants conducted on Zoom was approximately 10 million. In March this year, they reached more than 200 million meeting participants daily. Zoom is now the largest and most important video-conferencing platform in the world.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Thu, 16 Apr 2020 20:42:41 +0000 6000933 22744 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Alumnus and Professor Develop Novel, Low-Cost Ventilator https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-alumnus-and-professor-develop-novel-low-cost-ventilator <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Mike Sturdevant, a graduate of Cleveland State University’s mechanical engineering program, and Bogdan Kozul, a professor of practice in mechanical engineering at CSU, are working to develop new, low-cost ventilators to help address the large spike in need due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Their goal is to increase the national supply and ensure all have access to the life-saving machines.</p> <p>“As the COVID-19 pandemic expands, it has become apparent that there is a shortage of ventilators,” Sturdevant says. “Our effort seeks to create a backup device that can replace ventilators and that individuals can assemble from readily available components.”</p> <p>Sturdevant, Kozul, and their team have developed a mechanical bagger which allows a patient to be mechanically ventilated. It uses off the shelf resuscitation bags, which are not in short supply, and commercially available pneumatic components.</p> <p>In parallel, Will Kaigler, a faculty member at Carnegie Mellon University and his team have developed a Personal Negative Pressure Chamber (PNPC) which will capture the aerosolized air exhaled by patients through the bagger. The PNPC will then expel the air out of the building, through a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter. The product would act like a negative pressure room. Together, the mechanical bagger and PNPC can safely ventilate a COVID-19 patient.</p> <p>The team is developing the product as an open source design utilizing readily available materials. Even those without technical knowledge can easily assemble the device for a very modest cost. This will allow hospitals to quickly get new ventilators into the field to begin supporting the needs of their patients. </p> <p>The team has done initial simulation tests of the device in partnership with Akron Children’s Hospital and hopes to be able to release the product for public use very shortly.<br />  <br /> In addition to Sturdevant, Kozal and Kaigler, the team is made up of Jonathan Staggs (also a CSU alumnus), Joshua Staggs, Tim Staggs and Jim Clerkin who have volunteered their skills to assist in the design, modeling and assembly of the prototype.</p> <p>Those interested in testing the product or contributing to its development can contact Mike Sturdevant at <a href="mailto:sturd@virtecenterprises.com">sturd@virtecenterprises.com</a>.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###<br />  </p></div></div></div> Tue, 14 Apr 2020 19:34:31 +0000 6000933 22738 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Poetry Center Announces 2020–2022 Anisfield-Wolf Fellow https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-poetry-center-announces-2020%E2%80%932022-anisfield-wolf-fellow <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Kamden Hilliard named second fellow in writing and publishing</h6> <p>Cleveland State University’s Poetry Center has announced their second Anisfield-Wolf Fellow in Writing and Publishing, Kamden Hilliard. Hilliard, a poet, was chosen from among more than 100 candidates. </p> <p>Hilliard is the author of three chapbooks, most recently henceforce: a travel poetic, from Omnidawn Publishing. Their writing can be found in West Branch, Black Warrior Review, and Tagvverk. They study surveillance, race, queerness, and American politics. Hilliard earned a bachelors in American Studies from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, as well as a Masters in Fine Arts in Poetry from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. </p> <p>Hilliard comes to CSU from South Carolina, where they hold a position with AmeriCorps Vista that helps deliver mental health and anti-addiction services, particularly to LGBTQ youth.</p> <p>The Anisfield-Wolf Fellow is a two-year postgraduate fellowship that offers an emerging writer time to work toward a first or second book along with an opportunity to gain experience in editing, publishing, literary programming, and outreach in collaboration with the staff of the CSU Poetry Center. The fellowship works to support writers from historically underrepresented backgrounds in publishing while aiming to help address the lack of diversity in the U.S. publishing workforce.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Mon, 13 Apr 2020 15:22:29 +0000 6000933 22734 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Will Hold a Special Executive Committee Meeting of the Board of Trustees, April 6 https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-will-hold-special-executive-committee-meeting-board-trustees-april-6 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>The Executive Committee of the Cleveland State University Board of Trustees will hold a special meeting on Monday, April 6, 2020 at 1:30 p.m. to consider an application to the Ohio Chancellor regarding a reduction in tuition for non-resident graduate students.  The meeting will be held via ZOOM. To join the meeting click <a href="https://csuohio.zoom.us/j/7409605270">here</a> or dial312-626-6799 (Meetng ID: 7409605270).</p></div></div></div> Sat, 04 Apr 2020 16:15:28 +0000 6000933 22717 at https://www.csuohio.edu CountSupplies.org Tracks Available Ventilators https://www.csuohio.edu/news/countsuppliesorg-tracks-available-ventilators <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Tool allows hospitals to update their available ventilators on a daily basis </h6> <p>A team of professors and students from Cleveland State University has developed a new web application that will allow public health authorities to track the number of available ventilators each day by city, county and state. <a href="http://countsupplies.org/home">CountSupplies.org</a> allows hospitals to quickly and easily register and update their inventory of ventilators both in use, and available for use, on a daily basis.</p> <p>Dr. Patricia Stoddard Dare, professor of social work, and Dr. Miyuki Fukushima Tedor, associate professor of criminology, anthropology, and sociology, developed the specifications for app with technical specs designed by Computer and Information Science student, Abhijeet Bhimrao Tupe under the mentorship of Computer Science Professor Dr. Sathish Kumar.</p> <p>Launched March 26, the application allows public health and government authorities to identify the location of available ventilators. Passwords will be provided to hospitals for the purpose of registration and to authorized government and public health officials so they can view the results.</p> <p>The project builds off of the development of Drughelp.care, which was also led by Stoddard Dare and Tedor, and seeks to better connect individuals seeking drug treatment with available spaces in local treatment facilities. It was supported by CSU’s Office of Research and a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Data to Action grant through the Cuyahoga County Board of Health.</p> <p>“CountSupplies.org can provide critical information necessary to help manage the coronavirus pandemic,” notes Stoddard-Dare. “If hospitals devote 5 minutes to the one-time set-up and less than 2 minutes per day to update their available ventilators, this will save lives. </p> <p>“Knowing the number of in-use and available ventilators in each locality can guide decisions about shelter-in-place orders in specific areas and inform appropriate distribution of ventilators from the National Strategic Stockpile,” adds Tedor.</p> <p>The tracker will be available to participating hospitals and government authorities, free of charge. Cleveland State’s team is currently working on the next phase of development, which will upgrade the mapping feature and add a daily update email that will be sent to participating hospitals.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Thu, 02 Apr 2020 15:34:45 +0000 6000933 22716 at https://www.csuohio.edu Enhancing Health Care Services for the Incarcerated https://www.csuohio.edu/news/enhancing-health-care-services-for-incarcerated <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Dr. Meghan Novisky, an assistant professor of criminology at Cleveland State University, has received an Aging Research in Criminal Justice &amp; Health (ARCH) grant to enhance understanding of the unique health care issues facing incarcerated individuals in the U.S. The grant program, which is managed through the ARCH Network with funds provided by the NIH National Institute on Aging, supports a nationwide, multi-disciplinary community of emerging and established researchers aimed at catalyzing research and interventions designed to improve health and social outcomes in the growing population of criminal justice-involved older adults.</p> <p>Novisky’s project “Correctional Health Services for Older Adults: Older Adult and Caregiver Perspectives,” will seek to assess the current health care environment in prisons by conducting in-depth, focus group interviews with currently incarcerated older adults and their peer caregivers in Kentucky prisons. The effort builds on Novisky’s previous work which identified health care related barriers among older incarcerated adults in the Pennsylvania prison system. This included an examination of the disparate access older men have to health care and preventive health services during incarceration.</p> <p>“The number of criminal justice-involved older adults has risen dramatically in recent decades, resulting in a largely overlooked population of individuals with high rates of health disparities and profound, often co-occurring social and medical vulnerabilities,” Novisky says. </p> <p>“Unfortunately, health research has failed to keep pace with this demographic change, leaving little data on the actual impact this is having on the health of prison populations or what to do about it,” she adds. “Through this research my colleague and I hope to help provide information that will assist in developing interventions to meet this population’s unique needs, including focused programs on geriatric health, managing chronic disease and the social determinants of health.”</p> <p>The research will be conducted in collaboration with Dr. Stephanie Grace Prost, an assistant professor of social work at the University of Louisville.</p> <p>The Aging Research in Criminal Justice &amp; Health (ARCH) Network, founded in 2020, is jointly housed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). It was established with the intention of creating and using evidence-based health and healthcare solutions to design or inform policies and programs that advance criminal justice reform. </p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Wed, 01 Apr 2020 17:19:21 +0000 6000933 22710 at https://www.csuohio.edu Harlan Sands Hosts Next Student Town Hall May 6 https://www.csuohio.edu/news/harlan-sands-hosts-next-student-town-hall-may-6 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>CSU President Harlan Sands will host his next Student Town Hall on 1 p.m., Wednesday, May 6. He will answer student questions and provide updates on CSU's remote learning operations and continued response to COVID-19. Watch live at <a href="http://www.facebook.com/clevelandstateuniversity/">www.facebook.com/clevelandstateuniversity/</a>.</p></div></div></div> Mon, 30 Mar 2020 13:59:24 +0000 6000933 22705 at https://www.csuohio.edu COVID-19 Response - Supporting CSU Students https://www.csuohio.edu/news/covid-19-response-supporting-csu-students <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><img alt="Lift Up Vikes!" height="390" width="1000" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/LUV_mainpage_slider2.2.jpg" title="" /></p> <p>The global pandemic has placed unexpected financial challenges on many of our students who find themselves suddenly unemployed. If you are able, please consider providing critical, targeted assistance to students through a donation to Lift Up Vikes!</p> <p>Established in 2016, the mission of Lift Up Vikes! is to offer a simple, dignified, and compassionate process through which CSU students are connected to resources that supplement nutritional and other basic human needs.</p> <p>Donations made during this time will help students with housing, food and communication, in an effort to keep folks safe, healthy, and engaged as learners. To learn more about how you can help, visit <a href="http://www.supportcsu.org/lift-up-vikes" target="_blank">www.supportcsu.org/lift-up-vikes</a>.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Tue, 24 Mar 2020 15:49:56 +0000 6000933 22686 at https://www.csuohio.edu Board of Trustees Executive Committee Meeting will be Conducted Remotely https://www.csuohio.edu/news/board-trustees-executive-committee-meeting-will-be-conducted-remotely <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>The Executive Committee of the Cleveland State University Board of Trustees will meet at 12:00 pm, Friday, May 8. The committee will adjourn into executive session to consider personnel-related matters, including the employment and compensation of public employees. Due to the ongoing efforts to safeguard the health and safety of the community and the recent calls by Governor Mike DeWine to limit in-person meetings and practice social distancing, this session will be conducted virtually through Zoom.</p><p>To access the meeting virtually:</p><ul><li>Click the <a href="https://csuohio.zoom.us/j/92172827894">Zoom link</a> from your laptop or desktop computer to join the Zoom Meeting.</li><li>If you prefer to join via phone (no video) Dial: 312-626-6799, code 92172827894#</li></ul><p>Please contact the CSU IT help desk at 216-687-5050 if you have any problems connecting.</p><p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Wed, 18 Mar 2020 13:45:57 +0000 6000933 22672 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Takes Immediate Action to Ensure Health and Safety of Community https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-takes-immediate-action-ensure-health-and-safety-community <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>University to suspend all non-essential on-campus operations</h6> <p>CSU was notified today by the head coach of the Women’s Basketball Team, Chris Kielsmeier, that he has tested positive for COVID-19. This is the first confirmed case of COVID-19 at CSU and has been confirmed by Cuyahoga County health officials. With nothing more important than the health and welfare of the CSU community, University leaders are doing everything possible to support Coach Kielsmeier in his recovery and ensure that all who came into close contact with him are being contacted and given the best in medical advice and support. </p> <p>“It has been a very challenging couple of days,” said Chris Kielsmeier. “I am beginning to feel better and look forward to getting back to 100%.” </p> <p>“We appreciate Chris doing the right thing by staying home and alerting us as soon as he started feeling ill,” said CSU President Harlan Sands. “His actions were helpful in limiting exposure to the CSU community.”</p> <p>In response to this first confirmed case involving a member of the campus community, CSU is taking the following actions:</p> <ul> <li>We are working very closely with state, local, and community health officials to identify and notify those that have been in close contact with Coach Kielsmeier. Per established protocol, these individuals are being asked to self-isolate according to CDC protocols for COVID-19. We have also notified Horizon League officials and others where potential for close contact may have been possible. </li> <li>We are suspending all non-essential on-campus operations, and accelerating our timeline to Tuesday, March 17th to begin delivering university-wide services remotely.</li> <li>As per our prior announcement, we will continue our efforts during our extended spring break week that begins this Monday (March 16) to help faculty and staff transition to remote teaching and learning operations. Our plan remains to begin classes remotely for all students on March 23rd and continue through April 10th.  </li> <li>We will work to ensure we meet the needs of those students who must remain on campus.</li> <li>We will continue to work with state, local, and community officials to determine any additional steps needed to protect our campus community. </li> </ul> <p>More information about CSU’s response to COVID-19 can be found on the CSU website: <a href="http://www.csuohio.edu. ">www.csuohio.edu. </a></p> <p>There are several actions individuals can take to protect themselves from COVID-19, including:</p> <ul> <li>Stay home when sick</li> <li>Practice social distancing</li> <li>Wash hands frequently</li> <li>Cough or sneeze into a tissue and immediately discard it</li> <li>Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth</li> </ul> <p>The CSU Pandemic Response Team continues to work together to aggressively prevent the spread and transmission of COVID-19. We continue to remain vigilant, and will continue to communicate with the CSU community as events evolve during this difficult and uncertain time. </p> <p>MEDIA NOTE: Due to the circumstances, Coach Kielsmeier is focusing on recovery and is not available for further comment beyond the statement he has provided in this news release. CSU requests that media please respect Coach Kielsmeier’s privacy and not attempt to contact him.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Sun, 15 Mar 2020 01:36:34 +0000 6000933 22660 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU is Hiring for Over 40 New Faculty Positions https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-hiring-for-over-40-new-faculty-positions <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Effort seeks to enhance academic quality as part of new strategic priorities</h6> <p>Cleveland State University’s <a href="https://www.csuohio.edu/president/strategic-priorities">strategic priorities</a> include strengthening academic quality through the recruitment of additional full-time faculty. To that end, the University is currently hiring over 40 new full-time positions across the university. These faculty appointments will focus on enhancing research capacity in three interdisciplinary strategic areas: biomedical sciences and health professions; cybersecurity and data analytics and applied social sciences to support CSU’s urban anchor institution mission. Additional positions will be devoted to pedagogical and instructional improvement to enhance student success.</p> <p>With a strong upward momentum, Cleveland State is becoming a best-in-class urban research university. In addition, Cleveland is a vibrant city with a growing downtown and a large variety of cultural institutions, sports teams and outdoor recreation on the shores of Lake Erie. For more information about relocating to Cleveland, visit <a href="https://neorelocationguide.com/Cleveland/">https://neorelocationguide.com/Cleveland/</a>.</p> <p>It is a great time to join CSU and all talented candidates are encouraged to consider the open faculty positions posted below. Live web links to contacts for questions or more information are embedded in each open position. Applications will be exclusively accepted online. </p> <p><strong>Biomedical Sciences and Health Professions</strong><br /> <em>Washkewicz College of Engineering</em></p> <ul> <li>Two Tenure Track Assistant Professors in Mechanical Engineering with an emphasis in solid mechanics, manufacturing, or mechatronics, and their applications in biomechanics or human-machine systems. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11869">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11869</a></li> <li>Two Tenure Track Assistant Professors in Chemical and Biomedical Engineering with an emphasis in Biomaterials, Nanomaterials, Tissue Engineering, Biocatalysis, Bioseparations or Biofuels. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12097">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12097</a></li> </ul> <p><em>College of Sciences and Health Professions</em>    </p> <ul> <li>Two Tenure Track Assistant Professors in Biology, Geology, and Environmental Sciences – Biomedical research with an emphasis in computational/structural biology/bioinformatics. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11887">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11887</a></li> <li>Tenure Track Clinical Assistant Professor/Academic Fieldwork Coordinator Occupational Therapy (OT). Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11936">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11936</a></li> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor/ Assistant Clinical Professor in Occupational Therapy (OT). Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11941">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11941</a></li> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor in Psychology with an emphasis in Clinical Psychology. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11846">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11846</a></li> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor/ Clinical Professor with an emphasis in psychiatric/mental health. Position details available at </li> <li><a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12142">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12142</a></li> <li>Tenure Track Clinical Assistant Professor Ph.D. or DNP with an emphasis in psychiatric/mental health nursing specialty. Position details available at  <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12143">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12143</a></li> </ul> <p><em>School of Nursing</em>    </p> <ul> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor/ Clinical Professor with an emphasis in psychiatric/mental health. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12142">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12142</a></li> <li>Tenure Track Clinical Assistant Professor Ph.D. or DNP with an emphasis in psychiatric/mental health nursing specialty. Position details available at  <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12143">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12143</a></li> </ul> <p><em>College of Education &amp; Human Services</em>    </p> <ul> <li>Tenure track Assistant Professor in Exercise Science. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12131">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12131</a></li> </ul> <p><em>Cleveland-Marshall College of Law</em>    </p> <ul> <li>Assistant Professor of Law in Health. Posting details are forthcoming. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Cybersecurity and Data Analytics</strong><br /> <em>Monte Ahuja Collge of Business</em></p> <ul> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor in Operation Supply Chain Management with an emphasis in Cybersecurity/Data Analytics. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12122">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12122</a></li> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor in Information Systems with an emphasis in Cybersecurity/Data analytics. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12105">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12105</a></li> </ul> <p><em>Washkewicz College of Engineering</em></p> <ul> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor  in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) (Robotics/Cybersecurity/Data Analytics/ IOT</li> <li>Tenure Track Assistant /Associate Professor in Civil Engineering (CVE) (1st) –Data Analytics. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12036">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12036</a></li> <li>Two Tenure Track Assistant Professors in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science with an emphasis in Data Science, Internet of Things, and Cyber Security. Position details available at </li> <li><a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11875">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11875</a></li> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science with an emphasis in Internet of Things, Cyber Security, Robotics, Wireless Communications (including 5G), Cyber-Physical Systems and Autonomous Systems. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12115">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12115</a></li> </ul> <p><em>College of Sciences and Health Professions</em></p> <ul> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor in Math with an emphasis in Applied Statistics, Data Analytics, or Bioinformatics. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11937">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11937</a></li> </ul> <p><em>Cleveland-Marshall College of Law</em></p> <ul> <li>Assistant Professor of Law in Cybersecurity and Intellectual Property. Posting details are forthcoming.</li> </ul> <p><b>Applied Social Sciences to Support CSU's Abchor Instruction Mission</b><br /> <em>Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs</em></p> <ul> <li>Tenure track Assistant or Associate Professor in Nonprofit Management and Leadership. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11935">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11935</a></li> </ul> <p><em>College of Liberal Arts &amp; Social Sciences</em></p> <ul> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor in the Department of Theater and Dance. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12052">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12052</a></li> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor in Biological Anthropology. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12071">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12071</a></li> </ul> <p><em>Monte Ahuja College of Business</em></p> <ul> <li>Tenure Track Assistant or Associate Professor in Marketing.  Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12152">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12152</a></li> <li>Tenure Track Assistant Professor - Operation Supply Chain Management. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12106">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12106</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>Additional Positions Supporting Pedagogical and Instructional improvement</strong><br /> <em>Monte Ahuja College fo Business</em></p> <ul> <li>Visiting College Lecturer – Information Systems. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12314">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12314</a></li> <li>Non Tenure Track Assistant College Lecturer of Business Communication. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/9677">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/9677</a>.</li> <li>Non-Tenure Track Assistant College Lecturer in Management with an emphasis in Human Resource Management and/or Organizational Behavior. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12154">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12154</a></li> <li>Non-Tenure Track Assistant College Lecturer in Marketing. Posting available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12153">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12153</a></li> <li>Visiting College Lecturer in Management with an emphasis on Business Strategy. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12155">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12155</a></li> </ul> <p><em>College of Liberal Arts &amp; Social Sciences</em></p> <ul> <li>Non – Tenure Track Assistant Professor of Practice in the Department of Music, for Music Therapy. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12219">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12219</a></li> <li>Non-Tenure Track Assistant College Lecturer/ Professor of Practice in the School of Social Work. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11873">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11873</a></li> <li>Non-Tenure Track Assistant College Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy &amp; Comparative Religion with an emphasis in Applied Ethics and/ or Bioethics. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11938">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11938</a></li> <li>Non –Tenure Track Assistant Professor of Practice– Theater and Dance – Acting &amp; Directing. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12029">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12029</a></li> <li>Visiting Assistant Professor in Economics with an emphasis on Labor Economics Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11874">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11874</a></li> </ul> <p><em>College of Education &amp; Human Services</em></p> <ul> <li>Non Tenure Track Professor of Practice in Early Childhood Education. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12207">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12207</a></li> <li>Visiting Professor in Sports Management. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12345">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12345</a></li> <li>Non Tenure Track Professor of Practice in Counseling. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12208">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12208</a></li> </ul> <p><em>Washkewicz College of Engineering</em></p> <ul> <li>Multiple positions Lecturer / Visiting Professor / Professor of Practice in Computer Science in Computer. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/10655">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/10655</a></li> </ul> <p><em>School of Nursing</em></p> <ul> <li>Non Tenure Track Assistant College Lecturer in Psychology with an emphasis in Clinical psychology. Position details available at  <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11839">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/11839</a></li> <li>Non Tenure Track Assistant College Lecturer with an emphasis in maternal child nursing. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12138">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12138</a></li> <li>Two Non Tenure Track Assistant College Lecturer emphasis in expertise in general medical-surgical nursing and/or in a nurse specialty. Position details available at <a href="http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12139">http://hrjobs.csuohio.edu/postings/12139</a></li> </ul> <p><em>Cleveland-Marshall College of Law</em></p> <ul> <li>Legal Writing Professor. Posting details are forthcoming</li> </ul> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Mon, 09 Mar 2020 14:02:20 +0000 6000933 22640 at https://www.csuohio.edu Assessing the Scope of Witnessed Violence in Prisons https://www.csuohio.edu/news/assessing-scope-witnessed-violence-in-prisons <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>New study is one of few to focus on documenting observed violence in state prisons </h6> <p>The incidence of violence in American prisons has long been a known challenge for corrections managers and policy makers. However, there has been little research on how prison violence impacts incarcerated persons who witness violent acts, as most research focuses more narrowly on direct (personal) victimization and/or the perpetration of violence in prisons. </p> <p>A new study, co-authored by researchers at Cleveland State University and the University of Akron, assesses the scope of violence witnessed by a sample of recently incarcerated individuals. Results call into question how the types of traumatic experiences documented in the data may impact mental health, undermine rehabilitation efforts and heighten risks for recidivism. Several policy reforms are also explored to assist with reducing the incidence of prison violence and its consequences.  </p> <p>“Violence is prevalent in prisons, but the number of people who are direct victims of these acts is lower than the number of people who witness violence inflicted onto others,” notes Dr. Meghan Novisky, assistant professor of criminology at CSU and co-author of the study. “However, there are few resources available to currently or formerly incarcerated people to assist them in addressing the post traumatic stress, anxiety and depression they face based on secondary violence exposure.”</p> <p>Novisky and her coauthor, Dr. Robert Peralta, associate professor of sociology at the University of Akron, conducted comprehensive interviews with male and female former prisoners from 19 different medium and maximum-security prisons throughout the state of Ohio. All respondents in the study indicated witnessing violent acts inflicted on others during their incarceration, ranging from weaponized and non-weaponized physical assaults, to sexual assault, to homicide. </p> <p>Men and women in the study offered detailed accounts of the violence they witnessed and the psychological harms they felt they experienced as a result of witnessing this violence. Collectively, and despite no longer being in prison, respondents described problems with anxiety, hypersensitivity, depression, discomfort sharing space with others and difficulties with emotion regulation. These types of mental health issues have been identified by numerous researchers and advocates as barriers that can interfere with rehabilitation and prevent individuals from being successful with factors like employment and sobriety, which are critical to reducing recidivism among previously incarcerated people. </p> <p>“Witnessing acts of violence is likely to have especially potent psychological consequences for the incarcerated given that those held in captivity have few opportunities to avoid exposure, and incarcerated persons are often viewed as an unsympathetic population by the public, which limits the availability of resources that should be allocated to them” Novisky adds. “It is our hope these findings will provide a better understanding of what incarcerated persons face and how specific criminal justice reforms can be implemented to better address this challenge.”</p> <p>Novisky and Peralta argue that policy makers should look to reduce reliance on incarceration as a penalty, given the risks for severe negative effects for those exposed to prisons. They also call for increased training for correctional officers, counselors and parole officers on the prevalence and impacts of secondary exposure to violence, as well as the creation of more trauma-informed support services to assist current and former prisoners.</p> <p>“What we are really talking about here is PTSD, and we need to create a system that can better address this issue for the incarcerated, just as we have for other populations exposed to extreme violence, such as veterans and police officers,” Novisky says.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Mon, 02 Mar 2020 14:32:01 +0000 6000933 22602 at https://www.csuohio.edu Assessing the Scope of Witnessed Violence in Prisons https://www.csuohio.edu/news/assessing-scope-witnessed-violence-in-prisons-0 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>New study is one of few to focus on documenting observed violence in state prisons </h6> <p>The incidence of violence in American prisons has long been a known challenge for corrections managers and policy makers. However, there has been little research on how prison violence impacts incarcerated persons who witness violent acts, as most research focuses more narrowly on direct (personal) victimization and/or the perpetration of violence in prisons. </p> <p>A new study, co-authored by researchers at Cleveland State University and the University of Akron, assesses the scope of violence witnessed by a sample of recently incarcerated individuals. Results call into question how the types of traumatic experiences documented in the data may impact mental health, undermine rehabilitation efforts and heighten risks for recidivism. Several policy reforms are also explored to assist with reducing the incidence of prison violence and its consequences.  </p> <p>“Violence is prevalent in prisons, but the number of people who are direct victims of these acts is lower than the number of people who witness violence inflicted onto others,” notes Dr. Meghan Novisky, assistant professor of criminology at CSU and co-author of the study. “However, there are few resources available to currently or formerly incarcerated people to assist them in addressing the post traumatic stress, anxiety and depression they face based on secondary violence exposure.”</p> <p>Novisky and her coauthor, Dr. Robert Peralta, associate professor of sociology at the University of Akron, conducted comprehensive interviews with male and female former prisoners from 19 different medium and maximum-security prisons throughout the state of Ohio. All respondents in the study indicated witnessing violent acts inflicted on others during their incarceration, ranging from weaponized and non-weaponized physical assaults, to sexual assault, to homicide. </p> <p>Men and women in the study offered detailed accounts of the violence they witnessed and the psychological harms they felt they experienced as a result of witnessing this violence. Collectively, and despite no longer being in prison, respondents described problems with anxiety, hypersensitivity, depression, discomfort sharing space with others and difficulties with emotion regulation. These types of mental health issues have been identified by numerous researchers and advocates as barriers that can interfere with rehabilitation and prevent individuals from being successful with factors like employment and sobriety, which are critical to reducing recidivism among previously incarcerated people. </p> <p>“Witnessing acts of violence is likely to have especially potent psychological consequences for the incarcerated given that those held in captivity have few opportunities to avoid exposure, and incarcerated persons are often viewed as an unsympathetic population by the public, which limits the availability of resources that should be allocated to them” Novisky adds. “It is our hope these findings will provide a better understanding of what incarcerated persons face and how specific criminal justice reforms can be implemented to better address this challenge.”</p> <p>Novisky and Peralta argue that policy makers should look to reduce reliance on incarceration as a penalty, given the risks for severe negative effects for those exposed to prisons. They also call for increased training for correctional officers, counselors and parole officers on the prevalence and impacts of secondary exposure to violence, as well as the creation of more trauma-informed support services to assist current and former prisoners.</p> <p>“What we are really talking about here is PTSD, and we need to create a system that can better address this issue for the incarcerated, just as we have for other populations exposed to extreme violence, such as veterans and police officers,” Novisky says.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Mon, 02 Mar 2020 14:32:01 +0000 6000933 22603 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU President Harlan Sands Keynote to Bond Analysts - Challenges Facing Public Higher Education and CSU’s Strategic Response https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-president-harlan-sands-keynote-bond-analysts-challenges-facing-public-higher-education-and <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><img alt="Harlan M. Sands" height="400" width="600" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/Sands_0.jpg" title="" /></p> <p>Cleveland State University President Harlan M. Sands delivered the keynote address at an advanced seminar of the National Federation of Municipal Analysts on January 23 in Los Angeles. The seminar, entitled “Higher Education: Sector Under Stress,” brought together bond analysts and ratings agencies that follow public colleges and universities for a deep dive into challenges and opportunities across the sector.</p> <p>Sands presented a frank assessment of challenges facing public higher education across the nation and in the state of Ohio, then provided a blueprint on how these challenges also offered unique opportunities for urban research universities like Cleveland State. <br /> Sector “stressors” discussed included:</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li>Disinvestment in public higher education over the past 15 years; funding across the country remains at or below pre-recession levels </li> <li>Demographic changes that mean substantially fewer students will enter college over the next decade. For Ohio, this could mean a 12% decline in the number of high school graduates by 2031.</li> <li>Misperceptions that job sector demand for four-year degrees is declining </li> <li>Concerns about expanding student debt</li> <li>Real economic cost of low student retention and high transfer rates</li> <li>Unchecked tuition discounting with little understanding of impact on university financials </li> <li>Institutional inability and/or resistance to re-allocating funds internally</li> </ul> <p>Despite challenges, Sands is bullish on the outlook for institutions like CSU if they continue to promote access, affordability, a strong price-value proposition and the urban connection to experiential learning and jobs upon graduation. By advancing CSU’s brand as Cleveland’s only public research university, doubling down on innovative student success programs like individualized coaching and continuing to promote its competitive edge in established and new program offerings – all in a place where each students’ living-learning lab is the city of Cleveland – Sands believes CSU will grow and expand its reach.</p> <p>Sands outlined key initiatives that will expand opportunities for CSU students, including “cradle to career” student lifecycle management, commitment to student retention through innovative programs and support services that lead to graduation, a $1 million increase in need-based aid and greater international recruitment through its initiative, CSU Global. Sands also pointed to strong partnerships with three local community colleges for joint enrollment programs to fast-track students in high-demand career fields. Additionally, he expressed a commitment to look across the university’s entire operations to channel resources to services and academic programs that directly support students’ success throughout their educational experience and into their future careers.</p> <p>Sands noted that CSU recently welcomed its largest freshmen class ever, and that applications and enrollment trends clearly show that CSU is now a first-choice university for Northeast Ohio, across the state and internationally.</p> <p>In closing, Sands said that the keys to success for CSU in responding to the challenges facing public higher education are: “be proactive in addressing our challenges, creative in driving growth and open to redefining ourselves to meet current and future needs of students, employers and our community.”</p> <p class="rtecenter">###<br />  </p></div></div></div> Tue, 28 Jan 2020 15:15:28 +0000 6000933 22497 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Names Forrest Faison to Lead Research and Healthcare Strategy https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-names-forrest-faison-lead-research-and-healthcare-strategy <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Former Surgeon General of the Navy will drive expanded CSU/regional capability</h6> <p><img alt="Forrest Faison" height="390" width="1000" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="https://www.csuohio.edu/sites/default/files/front_page_slideshow/Forrest%20Faison.png" title="" /></p> <p>Vice Admiral Forrest Faison III, a longtime health care administrator and senior military commander with extensive experience in medical education and innovation, has been appointed senior vice president for research &amp; innovation/chief healthcare strategy officer at Cleveland State University. He will oversee the broad effort to unify and expand CSU’s educational, outreach and scholarship efforts in all aspects of health care, while spurring the continued growth of Cleveland as a center for medical innovation. He will also seek to develop new pathways and strategies designed to enhance the university’s status as a nationally recognized urban research university. </p> <p>“Forrest Faison is an innovative and energetic leader who has the experience, drive and national connections necessary to lead CSU’s continued evolution as a first-in-class research university and anchor and beacon institution for Northeast Ohio,” said Harlan Sands, president of Cleveland State University. “His leadership will also be critical to further our efforts to create the health care programs, technologies and workforce that will improve the lives of people throughout the community and enhance the continued advancement of the regional economy.”</p> <p>“Cleveland State University has a number of tremendous healthcare and research assets that are already providing significant value to the region and society as a whole,” Faison added. “I am excited at the opportunity to work with the University’s dedicated faculty, staff and students to build on these resources and further opportunities for innovation, research and technology transfer.”</p> <p>Faison retired in 2019 after a close to four-decade career in the United States Navy. Over his tenure, he rose to the rank of vice admiral and served as the 38th Surgeon General of the Navy and chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery from 2015 to 2019. In that role, Faison led a global healthcare network of 63,000 medical personnel stationed around the world who provide high quality health care to more than one million people.</p> <p>Faison is a native of Rocky River, Ohio and received his baccalaureate degree from Wake Forest University. He joined the Navy in 1980 and earned his doctorate degree in medicine and surgery from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in 1984. He completed post-graduate training in general pediatrics at Naval Hospital San Diego and fellowship training in neurodevelopmental pediatrics at the University of Washington.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:11:56 +0000 6000933 22478 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Receives Choose Ohio First Funding to Enhance Tech Workforce https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-receives-choose-ohio-first-funding-enhance-tech-workforce <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>$800,000 grant will support scholarships in computer science disciplines</h6> <p>Cleveland State University, along with numerous other universities across the state, will receive new scholarship support to boost efforts to strengthen the state’s workforce in technology-related fields such as coding and cybersecurity.</p> <p>The scholarship program, part of the <a href="https://www.ohiohighered.org/cof">Choose Ohio First</a> initiative, was announced by Lt. Governor Jon Husted and Ohio Department of Higher Education Chancellor Randy Gardner Dec. 12. It will support CSU students in computer science and mathematics, including those in degree and certificate programs, over the next five years.</p> <p>“The Choose Ohio First program is one of our state’s best tools to increase the number of students preparing to work in STEMM-related fields,” says Lt. Governor Husted. “In today’s technology-infused economy, every industry and business has important tech-focused jobs and training Ohioans for careers in those positions is key to growing our economy.”</p> <p>“CSU has been honored to participate in this incredibly important program, which ensures all students have access to a high-quality technology education,” adds Harlan M. Sands, president of Cleveland State. “This additional support will further our efforts to provide the high-tech workers Northeast Ohio needs to remain economically competitive.”</p> <p>CSU is slated to receive $800,000 to recruit Ohio residents into computer science and computer engineering undergraduate degrees, as well as computer science licensure or endorsement programs. Experiential learning through internships, co-ops and field experiences is also an integral component of this effort. The award complements CSU’s current Choose Ohio First programs that support many other science, technology, engineering, math and medicine (STEMM) majors, along with the National Science Foundation-funded Computer Science for Cleveland program.</p> <p>Choose Ohio First began in 2008 as a way to increase the number of Ohio students enrolling in and successfully completing STEMM programs at Ohio’s public and independent colleges and universities. The latest announcement will provide over $20 million in additional funding to support scholars attending 35 institutions across the state.</p> <p>“The ongoing investment in the Choose Ohio First program demonstrates the commitment of Governor DeWine, Lt. Governor Husted and the General Assembly to build a talent pipeline in Ohio to the leading technology occupations,” notes Chancellor Gardner. “This new focused scholarship will further strengthen the Choose Ohio First program and put more students on a path to success.”</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Fri, 13 Dec 2019 22:24:15 +0000 6000933 22443 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Welcomes New Vice President and Dean of Admissions https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-welcomes-new-vice-president-and-dean-admissions <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Jonathan Wehner will spearhead strategic enrollment initiatives</h6> <p>Jonathan Wehner, a longtime higher education executive with significant experience and success in new student recruitment and retention, has been appointed vice president and dean of admissions, enrollment management and student success at Cleveland State University. He will oversee all enrollment and recruitment initiatives, and seek to expand CSU’s efforts to become a first-choice, urban research university.</p> <p>“Jonathan Wehner has a proven track record of success in implementing innovative programs that have led to significant increases in enrollment through new student recruitment and retention,” says Randall C. Deike. “I am very pleased that he will be leading the great team we have here at Cleveland State.”</p> <p>“CSU is a major community asset and a growing national leader in urban higher education,” Wehner adds. “I am looking forward to working with everyone on campus to recruit and retain the talented and engaged students that will help us continue this tremendous momentum.”</p> <p>Wehner currently serves as vice president for enrollment management and dean of admissions at the Cleveland Institute of Art. In that role he has implemented strategic improvements that have led to a 45 percent increase in qualified applicants between fall 2017 and fall 2019. He previously served as director of recruitment and strategic initiatives at Case Western Reserve University from 2011 to 2016, where he was responsible for the vision, planning and execution of recruitment programs and integrated marketing campaigns for the Division of Enrollment Management.</p> <p>Wehner holds a BA in English and an MBA, both from Case Western.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Tue, 10 Dec 2019 19:15:55 +0000 6000933 22433 at https://www.csuohio.edu New Book Discusses Transformation of Journalism https://www.csuohio.edu/news/new-book-discusses-transformation-journalism <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Professor Richard Perloff highlights societal impact of 21st century media environment</h6> <p><em>The Dynamics of News</em>, a new book by Cleveland State University Professor Richard M. Perloff, argues that the transformation of journalism in the 21st century has impacted numerous aspects of society including politics, criminal justice, the economy and even what is considered a fact. Understanding these changes and how to operate within this new environment is critical for ensuring the news remains a viable avenue for informing the public and enhancing community dialogue.</p> <p>"News is not new and biased news dates back centuries. You can even find fake news in the penny press of the 1830s,” says Perloff, who serves as a professor of communication, political science and psychology. “But social media has changed the way factual news reports are viewed and interpreted. This, coupled with President Trump's undemocratic attack on the news media, have left many Americans confused about the nature and importance of facts.”</p> <p>The book takes readers on a “guided-tour” of the theoretical foundations, history and changing features of the news in modern society. This includes an in-depth discussion of the overarching forces involved in contemporary news gathering,  the current critical economic determinants of the media industry and innovative trends in the future of journalism. Perloff also raises important questions surrounding whether the news perpetuates the status quo or is a force for change in society.</p> <p>“News and journalism are not synonymous and good reporting and analysis can still succeed even in our fragmented news environment,” Perloff adds. “We need good journalism today, whether in print, on television or through the many exciting online ventures that young journalists are launching.”</p> <p>“<em>The Dynamics of News</em> offers and unflinching look at the foundations, features, flaws and future of a maligned but magnificent institution, journalism,” notes Tim Vos, professor and director of the School of Journalism at Michigan State University. “By offering critical insight into how news turns out the way it does, Perloff helps readers see the limits and importance of the news in today’s evolving information environment.”</p> <p>The book is published by Routlledge and is available for purchase at <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Dynamics-News-Richard-M-Perloff/dp/0815377894">https://www.amazon.com/Dynamics-News-Richard-M-Perloff/dp/0815377894</a>.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Tue, 03 Dec 2019 21:12:19 +0000 6000933 22417 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Presents: The 2019 Kuumba Arts Festival https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-presents-2019-kuumba-arts-festival <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Cleveland State University’s Black Studies Program and Howard A. Mims African American Cultural Center will present the 2019 Kuumba Arts Festival, on Saturday, December 7 at 6:00 pm in Berkman Hall Auditorium. </p> <p>This year’s festival, Echoes From Past, is directed by Prester Pickett, M.F.A., coordinator of the Howard A. Mims African American Cultural Center, and will serve as the culminating event of fall activities associated with Project 400, CSU’s year-long commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the first Africans arriving in the present-day United States. The festival serves as a pre-Kwanzaa celebration for the Greater Cleveland community and will highlight performance art traditions associated with efforts to abolish slavery, pronounce citizenship and secure suffrage. Additionally, the festival will acknowledge the contributions of deceased community members to the Black Studies Program who have transitioned into their status as “ancestors” over the course of this past year.</p> <p>Negro spirituals will be sung by members of the Warrensville Heights High School Gospel Choir in union with the Heritage Chorale under the direction of William Brewer, while African drumming and dance will be performed by members of the Djapo Cultural Arts Institute under the direction of Talise Campbell, who will receive the Silver B. Award at this year’s festival. Connections to the past will also be made through orchestrated performances of classical music sung by Steven Weems in concert with hip hop performances by Leon Hope and Carmen Brown.</p> <p>The “Ain’t I a Woman” speech by Sojourner Truth will be delivered by movie actress Jeannine Gaskin and will align with a Black Lives Matter movement piece. The show also includes poetry by Langston Hughes, Sonja Sanchez, and Gil Scott Heron woven into celebrated works by Sweet Honey in the Rock brought to the stage by the Hue People. Additional professional vocalists featured on the program include Bertha Lee Pickett, Robert and Andrea Coleman and the R &amp; B group SweetEven.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Fri, 22 Nov 2019 16:24:51 +0000 6000933 22399 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Presents Sixth Annual Archeology Symposium https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-presents-sixth-annual-archeology-symposium <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Cleveland State University’s Department of Criminology, Anthropology and Sociology will present its sixth annual Archeology Symposium Thursday, November 21. The event will highlight faculty and student field studies at a host of historic sites across the state including at several never before excavated locations.</p> <p>The symposium will be held from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Berkman Hall Auditorium on the CSU campus. All of the studies being presented are part of the Department’s summer field school which provides engaged learning opportunities for CSU archeology and anthropology students who get a chance to conduct excavations and analyses with professionals currently working in the field.</p> <p>“This symposium provides an opportunity to highlight the tremendous efforts of our students and faculty, while illustrating the significant scientific and archeological value this work produces,” says Phil Wanyerka, organizer of the symposium.</p> <p>To learn more about the Department of Criminology, Anthropology and Sociology, visit <a href="https://class.csuohio.edu/cas">https://class.csuohio.edu/cas</a>.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Fri, 15 Nov 2019 16:28:51 +0000 6000933 22390 at https://www.csuohio.edu Expanding Athletic Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities https://www.csuohio.edu/news/expanding-athletic-opportunities-for-individuals-with-disabilities <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>CSU develops adaptive lacrosse clinic for local children</h6> <p>Cleveland State University’s School of Health Sciences has partnered with the CSU Lacrosse Team to create an adaptive lacrosse clinic for individuals with disabilities. The effort seeks to enhance physical activity, socialization and athletics participation for children with cognitive, sensory and physical disabilities, while also providing a unique engaged learning opportunity for health science students and CSU student athletes.</p> <p>“Game play is an extremely effective tool for assisting children with disabilities in increasing cognition and coordination, while helping them feel like normal kids,” says Joanna DeMarco, program director and associate college lecturer in CSU’s School of Health Sciences, who helped organize the clinic.</p> <p>DeMarco had set up an adaptive lacrosse clinic in Olmstead Falls, where her two children play the sport. She saw an opportunity to expand that effort regionally and involve CSU undergraduate health science students and graduate occupational therapy students and partnered with then Viking head coach Dylan Sheridan to create a training program at CSU.</p> <p>She recruited graduate occupational therapy students to develop a training guide for teaching lacrosse to individuals with special needs. The students then trained CSU lacrosse players to lead the adaptive clinics, the first of which was help on campus in October. It featured 11 participants with cognitive and sensory processing disorders. DeMarco and her students are now working with current CSU head lacrosse coach Andrew German to expand the program, including developing  training modules and adaptations for working with individuals with physical abilities and distributing these resources into the community. The next clinic is scheduled to be held in spring 2020.</p> <p>“The opportunity to work with Dr Demarco and her team to bring their vision to life was an amazing experience,” German adds. “Cleveland State is built on engaged learning and this clinic was the epitome of bringing ideas, research and teamwork to life. Blending the academic side of campus with the athletics side was a total win-win for all of us, and we are excited about the future as this is just the beginning of something really special!”</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Thu, 07 Nov 2019 18:45:44 +0000 6000933 22377 at https://www.csuohio.edu Paid Sick Leave Results in More Financial Security for Workers https://www.csuohio.edu/news/paid-sick-leave-results-in-more-financial-security-for-workers <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h6>Study is first to explore connection between workplace benefits &amp; retirement savings</h6> <p>The United States is facing a retirement savings crisis. Nearly half of all Americans have nothing saved for their retirement or have no access to retirement plans at work. About half of white Americans will not be able to maintain their standard of living in retirement and the situation is even more dire for black and Hispanic Americans. Understanding what variables influence workers’ retirement savings and to what extent is critical.</p> <p>A Cleveland State University and Florida Atlantic University study is the first to collectively explore the relationship between workplace employment benefits and retirement savings. Researchers examined 994 older  U.S. male workers (ages 47-55) by their access to flextime (flexible hours and telecommuting), paid sick leave and vacation time.   </p> <p>Results of the study, published in the journal <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13668803.2019.1677557">Community, Work &amp; Family</a>, showed that after controlling for 12 demographic, education, household, and work-related variables, including income, workers with flexible work time enjoyed a 24.8 percent increase in retirement savings compared to those who did not have flexible work time. Workers with paid sick leave had retirement savings 29.6 percent higher than those workers who lacked paid sick leave benefits. In addition, when measuring the number of paid sick days, workers with six to 10 paid sick leave days and workers with more than 10 paid sick leave days annually had a statistically and significantly higher amount in their retirement savings (30.1 percent and 40.7 percent, respectively).</p> <p>“Our findings add to a growing body of literature that examines the relationship between employment benefits and employee well-being,” said Patricia Stoddard Dare, Ph.D., lead author and a professor of social work at Cleveland State University. “Managing the competing demands of work, health and family life is a challenge for most Americans. That is why it’s vital to design employment benefits packages that allow workers to remain in the labor force, receive wages during brief periods of sick leave, and benefit from long-term continuous retirement savings that will hopefully result in financial security during the golden years of life.” </p> <p>The researchers also found statistically significant decreases in retirement savings for workers with only one to five vacation days annually.</p> <p>“These findings appear to point to a relationship between having sick days and flexible work options to increased retirement savings, which might mean that workers are able to stay attached to work and retirement savings programs regardless of personal or family health issues when time away from work is needed,” said  LeaAnne DeRigne, Ph.D., co-author and an associate professor in the Phyllis and Harvey Sandler School of Social Work within FAU’s College for Design and Social Inquiry. “When employees have access to sick leave they don’t have to put their jobs in jeopardy to manage a health care crisis.”</p> <p>The finding that older adult male workers with an increased number of paid sick days (six to 10 days, and more than 10 days) have increasingly larger gains in their retirement savings also supports efforts to empirically determine the ideal number of paid sick days that are necessary to observe positive associations for workers.</p> <p>Although prior research has shown positive and negative correlates of flexible workplace benefits on employees, in this study’s sample of older adult male workers, those with flexible working conditions enjoyed significantly higher retirement savings compared to workers without this benefit.</p> <p>For the study, DeRigne and Stoddard-Dare used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), which included a total of 12,686 respondents in the 2012 NLSY dataset. The 994 adult males in the study were 21.2 percent black, 17 percent Hispanic, and 61.8 percent non-black and non-Hispanic. On the high end, 47.1 percent of the sample had access to all three benefits, and on the low end, 0.7 percent of the sample had access to only paid sick leave and no flexible work or vacation days.</p> <p>Among the workers studied, those who were black and/or Hispanic and those without college experience had at least a 25 percent reduction in their retirement accounts compared to either non-black, non-Hispanic males or those with some college education.</p> <p>DeRigne, Stoddard-Dare and co-authors Cyleste Collins, Ph.D., an assistant professor of social work; and Linda M. Quinn, Ph.D., a professor of practice of mathematics, both at Cleveland State University, emphasize that all of these findings can be considered as human resource planners and policymakers study ideal benefits to support their employees’ financial security.</p> <p>These robust results fill an important gap demonstrating the unique value in the availability of paid sick leave and flexible work arrangements that cannot be accounted for by vacation when it comes to retirement savings among older adult males. Although future research is needed, these findings suggest that expanding access to paid sick leave and flexible work might support workers as they plan for retirement.</p> <p class="rtecenter">- ###-</p></div></div></div> Tue, 05 Nov 2019 17:33:21 +0000 6000933 22371 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Faculty Receive Women Living STEM Awards https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-faculty-receive-women-living-stem-awards <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Cleveland State University faculty Meredith Bond, dean of the College of Science and Health Professions, and Debbie Jackson, an associate professor in the College of Education and Human Services, have received inaugural Women Living STEM Awards from the Northeast Ohio STEM Ecosystem and the Teaching Institute for Excellence in STEM (TIES). The award recognizes leading advocates for science, technology, engineering and mathematics in the region.</p> <p>“Northeast Ohio has quietly been at the heart of STEM innovation throughout the country, with women making many meaningful contributions,” the organizations noted in the award announcement. “These honorees lead and live STEM every day through their passion for progressing the industry and supporting and encouraging girls and young women to further their interests, education and impact in all things STEM.”</p> <p>“A strong STEM ecosystem is a central component of a strong economy and a healthy society,” Bond says. “I am so proud to have been able to play a role in advancing the development of this ecosystem in Northeast Ohio, while ensuring all have access to top quality STEM education.”</p> <p>“I have a passion for education and for the STEM disciplines and I am thankful that my efforts have helped make an impact,” Jackson says. “I would like to thank the Northeast Ohio STEM Ecosystem and TIES for this tremendous honor and want to congratulate all of the STEM leaders that also received this recognition.”</p> <p>Bond has served as dean of the College of Science and Health Professions since 2011. She previously served as chair of the Department of Physiology in the School of Medicine at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and as a staff researcher in the Department of Molecular Cardiology at the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute. She has also held a number of national leadership roles related to the effort to increase minority and women representation in STEM fields. This includes serving as a member of the Academic Leadership Forum of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians.</p> <p>Jackson currently serves as the Interim Department Chair of Teacher Education and was previously the Director of the CSU STEMM Education Center which seeks to enhance research and educational innovation across campus and in the community in the areas of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine. She also conducts nationally recognized research in the areas of STEM learning, teacher education and teaching practice. This includes co-leading CSU’s NSF-funded Computer Science for All initiative, which seeks to train local high school teachers to provide computer science education for their students.</p> <p>For more information about the Women Living Stem Awards including a list of all honorees, visit <a href="https://www.womenlivingstem.com/">https://www.womenlivingstem.com/</a>.</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Fri, 01 Nov 2019 19:17:24 +0000 6000933 22363 at https://www.csuohio.edu CSU Mourns the Passing of Mort Mandel https://www.csuohio.edu/news/csu-mourns-passing-mort-mandel <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Mort Mandel, an innovative businessman, prominent community leader and longtime supporter of Cleveland State University, passed away October 16. Below is a statement from CSU President Harlan Sands:</p> <p>“It is with great sadness that we collectively mourn the loss of Mort Mandel, a giant in the Cleveland community for five decades, and the last living namesake of our Mandel Honors College.</p> <p>An incredibly innovative and successful businessman, Mort dedicated his life to giving back to his community. Along with his brothers Jack and Joseph, he created a lasting legacy of philanthropy that has transformed our city and the lives of many throughout our region.</p> <p>At Cleveland State, the Mandels’ generosity helped create the Mandel Honors College, our unique student experience that combines academic excellence, experiential learning and community service to ensure all graduates have the skills and insights necessary to be future leaders of Cleveland and beyond. They also provided support for an innovative Honors Pathway Program so honors students at Cuyahoga Community College can transfer seamlessly to the Mandel Honors College at CSU.</p> <p>This is the legacy that Mort and his brothers have left us, and for that, we are forever grateful.</p> <p>We look forward to the opportunity to celebrate his life and contributions in the days to come. For today, our prayers go out to his family, friends and many others whose lives he has touched, and who collectively and individually are feeling this loss in a very personal way.”</p> <p class="rtecenter">###</p></div></div></div> Fri, 18 Oct 2019 18:19:08 +0000 6000933 22315 at https://www.csuohio.edu